FS═ Archaeological Reports

The Institute of Archaeology - Fornleifastofnun ═slands (FS═) - have made available 149 reports. These are arranged in alphabetical order below and are all available as PDF files. Note that some are in Icelandic, but others are in English (with English titles).

FS═'s reports are also available from the their website.

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2011 Archaeological investigations on the fishing station at Gufuskßlar, SnŠfellsnes [PDF 11.1 MB]
Following assessment in 2008, when four erosion scars were cleaned back and sections drawn, an archaeological excavation took place in 2011. The focus within the site was on the two main mounds by the sea which are under threat by active marine and wind erosion. Based on work done in 2008, four trenches (Tr. Nr. 5,6,7 and 8) were placed in the most eroded areas of the two mounds. A new topographic survey was done on the two mounds but also on other visible structures such as the farm mounds and alleged ■urrab˙­s. In total, an area of about 7.2 hectares was covered and around 47 structures mapped in. [More details about this project.]

A system of earthworks in north-east Iceland - Interim Report 2005 [PDF 2.9 MB]
2005 was the second year of the project. The main component of 2005 was fieldwork. Fifteen boundaries were excavated, recorded and their tephra deposits analysed. As a result several all the excavated boundaries were dated and their construction and site formation processes were recorded. Most of them can be dated to post 870 - pre 1158 or 1300, based on tephra. A few have a post date of 1477 and one was clearly not erected until after 950. The modern homefield boundary of Narfasta­ir was not built until after the deposition of the 1717 tephra and an older wall was not visible underneath. [More details about this project.]

A system of earthworks in north-east Iceland - Interim Report 2006 [PDF 23.5 MB]
2006 was the third year of the project which aims to map and investigate an extensive system of earthworks in S-Ůingeyjarsřsla. In addition to mapping eleven boundaries were excavated and recorded of which seven were examined by a tephra specialist and others also had clear tephras for dating. All postdate the landnßm tephra from ca. 871 AD and one postdates the 1300 tephra. Five predate 1158, four predate 1300 and two predate 1477. So far a total of 26 trenches have been excavated. [More details about this project.]

Archaeological Assessment, H÷f­ager­i, N˙par 2002: Interim Report [PDF 0.8 MB]
In 2002 topographic survey and preliminary excavation took place in H÷f­ager­i, S-Ůingeyjarsřsla, as a part of the Landscape of settlements project. The site is a complex of ruins and earthworks by the river Laxß. The aim was to establish a date and function for some of the structures. Test trenches were excavated in three locations (B,C and V). The excavation revealed well preserved turf structures and well detectable tephra layers. The preliminary results indicate that the H÷f­ager­i site probably dates back to the 12th century the latest, and that it was still occupied in the 14th or 15th century. While V was obviously an enclosure wall, further research is needed to determine the function of the two subrectangular structures. It is however reasonable to suggest that B was a byre and C probably a dwelling. [More details about this project.]

Archaeological Assessment, H÷f­ager­i, N˙par 2003: Interim Report [PDF 1.4 MB]
Following assessment in 2002, a more comprehensive programme of archaeological investigations in H÷f­ager­i took place in 2003.There were several focus areas within the site: single, ancient looking ruins and an alleged farm mound. Additionally, investigations took place across the homefield boundary, as well as test pitting within the environs of the site to determine the survival of tephra and assess the degradation of the natural environment. The excavations indicate H÷f­ager­i has a pre-1104 origins, although on site activity shifted between areas within the homefield area, possibly sometime after 1300. Activity on the site, indicated by the excavations, suggests the occupation of the site ceased before 1477, and thereon only two recent additions to the site, a telephone junction and a small summer house complex were added in the twentieth century. [More details about this project.]

Archaeological Excavations at A­alstrŠti 14-18 - 2001 A Preliminary Report [PDF 1.5 MB]
A major archaeological excavation was carried out at A­alstrŠti 14-16, ReykjavÝk between January and June 2001 in advance of proposed redevelopment. The work was undertaken by Fornleifastofnun ═slands on behalf of ┴rbŠrsafn, the Reyjavik City Museum. Previous archaeological work at and adjacent to the site between 1971-741, had revealed the remains of a number of structures, dating both to the settlement period and to the 18th-19th century. The new excavations revealed a complex sequence of remains from the latter period, and beneath these, the exceptionally well preserved remains of a Viking period skßli (or hall). Additionally, the skßli was found to overlay the fragmentary traces of an earlier phase of occupation, thought to represent the earliest known archeological remains in Iceland. A large number of artefacts was recovered, although primarily from the more recent layers. An extensive program of environmental sampling was undertaken and included the complete recovery of probable floor layers associated with the skßli. [More details about this project.]

Archaeological Excavations in Ůegjandadalur 2007-2008 [PDF 3.1 MB]
This report contains the results of excavations in Ůegjandadalur in 2007 and 2008. Several settlement remains are visible in Ůegjandadalur which is believed to have been abandoned in the 15th century. The preliminary goal of research in 2007 and 2008 was to acquire dating evidence for both the establishment of settlement in the valley, and for its abandonment. To this end, the sites of Einarssta­ir and IngirÝ­arsta­ir were identified as most promising. Both sites exhibit complex systems of boundaries and enclosures that define the farm territories and home fields. The focus of research was IngirÝ­arsta­ir as it showed better preservation of tephra than Einarssta­ir. Several trenches were excavated. Most structures predate tephra from 1300 but however later reuse is evident on top of the farm mound- possibly a shieling or a sheephouse. Some possible ploughmarks were found in the homefield and last but not least a couple of pagan burials just above the homefield - and more can be expected. Ůegjandadalur awaits further research. [More details about this project.]

Archaeological Fieldwork at Svalbar­, NE Iceland 2013 [PDF 2.6 MB]
2013 was the most extensive year in archaeological research in Svalbar­stunga. The field season started on the 15th of July and lasted until 3rd of August. The archaeological field crew consisted of Dr. James Woollett (Laval University), Uggi Ăvarsson (archaeologist and Cultural Heritage Manager of Southern Iceland), CÚline Dupont- HÚbert (Laval University), Gu­r˙n Alda GÝsladˇttir og Stefßn Ëlafsson (Institute of Archaeology, Iceland), Dr. VÚronique Forbes (University of Aberdeen), Natasha Roy (Laval University), Astrid Daxb÷ck (Institute of Archaeology, Iceland), Jˇnas H. Jˇnasson (student, Univesity of Iceland) og Martin Fields (student, Laval University). Also Dr. Paul Adderley (Stirling University, Scotland) which conducted the pedological survey of the homefield in Svalbar­ and Magn˙s ┴. Sigurgeirsson geologist who identified and confirmed tephra in the area and Kristborg ١rsdˇttir and Sˇlveig Gu­mundsdˇttir Beck (Institute of Archaeology, Iceland) continued with the archaeological site survey in Svalbar­stunga. Targeted sites for archaeological excavation in 2013 were: Sjˇh˙svÝk, K˙­ß, BŠgissta­ir, HjßlmarvÝk, Skri­a og Svalbar­ - see reports this volume. One of the main results this year are the refinement of site chronologies through a broadened local tephra sequence, including most notably the identification of the most recent of the Landnam tephras (ca. 940 AD) (see Magn˙s ┴. Sigurgeirsson report this volume). The association of this tephra with archaeological deposits at Hjalmarvik and with archaeologically sterile substrates underlying other sites provides a timeframe of the initial settlement of Svalbardstunga. The research crew has made their work visible in the community by guiding guests, inform the community about the research programme, by visiting the local school, giving interviews to papers, international magazines and international radio stations. [More details about this project.]

Archaeological Investigations at Gßsir, 2002 - A Preliminary Report [PDF 2.1 MB]
The excavation in 2002 revealed at least 10 seperate rooms or booths belonging to four different phases. A lot of the effort went into defing the limits of previous excavations from 1907. Underwater survey was conducted to estimate the preservation of remains in the sea in front of Gßsir. The results were not promising and probably archaeological remains have been carried away by currents. [More details about this project.]

Archaeological Research at Gßsir, 2001 - An Interim Report [PDF 1.4 MB]
Gßsir is a well known medieval trading place in Eyjafj÷r­ur, N-Iceland. In 2001 a preliminary excavation was carried out after a new Gßsir project had received a grant from KristnihßtÝ­arsjˇ­ur. The site had previously been excavated partly in 1907 and 1986 and the results showed tremendous complexity of the archaeological deposits. A new map was produced by survey in 2001 and a number of previous excavation trenches were re-opened and re-assessed. The evidence suggests a lengthy and complex sequence of occupation, and is interpreted as seasonal occupation for the purposes of trading. Informal temporary structures were found, along with deposits below sea-level, indicating potential for the preservation of organic remains. A five year program of archaeological excavation was proposed after the 2001 season. [More details about this project.]

Archaeological investigations at Sveigakot 2002 [PDF 1.1 MB]
Two areas were excavated this season: Area S, the earlier skßli with extensions, was excavated apart from the floor layers awaiting the next season. It proved to post-date tephra from 950. Extensions to the east and north belong to the later building phase earlier excavated - the eastern one was most likely a byre. In area T the excavation of two pit houses was completed - the larger one predates the smaller and is interpreted as storage for food. Structures from the 9th and 10th centuries still remain to be found but that seems to have been the prime of the settlement judging from the bone assemblage from the midden. Structures already excavated all date to the late 10th-12th century and it can not be ruled out that Sveigakot was inhabited until the 13th century. The earlier skßli in S was abandoned in the 11th century but reused as a shelter of some sort, possibly a shieling. Late in the 11th century Sveigakot was inhabited again, marked by the building of the latest skßli which later had extensions added to it. [More details about this project.]

Archaeological investigations at Sveigakot 1998-2000 [PDF 1.3 MB]
The site of Sveigakot was discovered during survey in the southernmost part of Sk˙tsta­ahreppur, now eroded, in 1998. Faunal material from Sveigakot was considered ideal for comparison with Hofsta­ir, a high status Viking Age site in the same area. Trial excavation was carried out in 1999, revealing a sheet midden with several Viking Age finds. Based on tephra the site was dated to the 9th-10th centuries. This was supported by C14 analysis from bones found in the midden. At the end of the 2000 season it had been established that there are at least three distinct midden phases; the lower midden from c. 870-950, upper midden from after 950 and the midden in area T which may be from the early 11th century. No structure revealed so far seems to predate a tephra believed to date to ca. 950 AD. A small domestic building was also revealed in 2000. Sveigakot has some interesting contradictions, that is a faunal assemblage pointing to substantial farming on one hand - but on the other hand one of the smallest dwellings (Structure 1) ever excavated in Iceland. This could possibly point to an outstation rather than an independant farm. [More details about this project.]

Archaeological investigations at Sveigakot 2001- including preliminary investigations at HrÝsheimar, Selhagi and Ytri Tunga [PDF 5.0 MB]
The 2001 season in Sveigakot saw excavation in three areas: The midden (M) was completed, found to predate tephra thought to be from 950 AD. Nearly 50 l of animal bone was retrieved from that layer. Excavation in area S (skßli) was continued. The skßli had been rebuilt on a larger house, around 20 m long, which could possibly have served as a byre at the eastern end. It seems that the older house was abandoned but then reused for a while, perhaps as a shieling, and then rebuilt again in the 12th century. Excavation in area T was commenced where a small midden had been excavated in 2000. A series of pithouses predating the skßli were discovered beneath the midden, possibly dating to about 950-1050. A few possible medieval sites in the area were trenched for dating and preservation: 1) H÷f­i in Tj÷rnes, proved not to be a dwelling. 2) Selhagi, dated from 10th-13th centuries. 3) HrÝsheimar - not well dated but finds point to a Viking Age date. Both Selhagi and HrÝsheimar show good preservation and seem to have the same faunal pattern as Hofsta­ir and Sveigakot, including marine fish and birds from the seaside. [More details about this project.]

Archaeological investigations at Sveigakot 2003 [PDF 3.6 MB]
As in previous years excavation in 2003 was focussed on two main areas. The lowest floor in the skßli, which clearly postdates the 950 tephra, was removed and proved to be sealing older structures, postholes and a fireplace which is now the earliest structure that has been excavated on site, dated to c. 871-950. A paved surface east of the skßli, earlier believed to be the central aisle of a byre, has been reinterpreted as a paved outside area although it cannot be ruled out that an earlier structure was in the place prior to it. The pithouse excavated in 2001-2002 turned out to be the backroom of a larger sunken featured building which predates it. [More details about this project.]

Archaeological investigations at Sveigakot 2004 [PDF 3.7 MB]
In 2004 the excavation area in Sveigakot was enlarged by interconnecting areas S and T - which brings the area up to a total of 645 m2. Excavation of several Viking Age structures was continued, including features predating skßli the skßli floor, structure S7 which also predates the skßli and is now interpreted as a byre which has partly been reused as a smithy. A few sunken featured buildings were continued, called P1, P2 and MT. At least two of those and the alleged byre predate 950 judging from tephra. An attempt was made to establish a chronology for the structures excavated so far. What is interesting and highly unusual is that at least three generations of pithouses had been abandoned before the skßli was erected - on top of the byre. This makes Sveigakot a highly unusual Viking Age farmstead and a few possible explanations are introduced at the end of the report. [More details about this project.]

Archaeological investigations at Sveigakot 2005 [PDF 2.4 MB]
2005 saw the seventh and hopefully penultimate season of excavation work at Sveigakot. The excavation area was extended eastwards by 44 m2 and westwards in area N by 10 m2 so the whole excavation area now measures some 690 m2. Of these some 400 m2 were under excavation in 2005. With the extensions made in 2005 it can now be stated with confidence that the archaeological deposits on the northern, eastern and southern sides of the site have been defined but it is still possible that area P will need to be extended by 1 or 2 metres westwards. [More details about this project.]

Archaeological investigations at Sveigakot 2006 [PDF 8.4 MB]
In 2006 the excavation of Sveigakot was completed. The work concentrated on three complexes in the centre of the excavation area and only miniscule extensions were made to the limits of excavation. A single square metre was opened at the north-eastern corner of MP1 and 3 square metres to the west of P1. In addition a scatter of non-local stone, presumably from a completely eroded building, was recorded some 10 m east of the northern end of the site. [More details about this project.]

Archaeological investigations in Ůjˇrsßrdalur 2001 [PDF 1.8 MB]
The investigation in 2001 involved two steps: 1) Survey to produce an adequate map of the valley. This was done partly in 1999 and 2000 by an Icelandic and Danish team but contour surveys were added in 2001. 2) Reexcavation of a key site, Skallakot. The excavation revealed a skßli, sealed by H-1104 tephra. The skßli could possibly seal older remains on site. It has been truncated by earlier excavations but still a considerable portion of floor layers appears to be preserved external buildings were better preserved. Skallakot proved promising for further excavation and could add valubale information to the understanding of Viking Age farmsteads. Bruno Berson carried out a side project to locate byres and other outhouses in the same area. Five trenches were excavated and two sites recommended for further investigation, Skallakot and ┴slßkstunga innri. [More details about this project.]

Archaeological investigations in Mřvatnssveit 2007 [PDF 4.8 MB]
Five trenches were excavated in Mřvatnssveit in 2007 to date sites suspected to be early: Beinissta­ir, GeldingatŠttur, Litlu-Gautl÷nd, Ůorleifssta­ir, Selholt . Four of the sites trenched were dated to pre 1300 by tephra and some were obviously earlier. It can be maintained from combined results from trenching over the last years that a large number of farms was abandoned in Mřvatnssveit before 1300 and earlier in some cases. Furthermore some coring took place at modern farm sites to try and locate middens. All corings were successful but the midden in Sk˙tusta­ir south of Mřvatn was chosen for further investigation. [More details about this project.]

Archaeological investigations in Mřvatnssveit, Reykjadalur and Svartßrkot 2010 [PDF 7.1 MB]
Although major excavations in Mřvatnssveit wound to a close in 2006 fieldwork has continued there every season since. The largest single component has been the midden excavation at Sk˙tusta­ir from 2008 and in 2010 excavation of the Christian cemetery in Hofsta­ir resumed after a break of several years. In 2007 a number of sites were targeted for minor interventions both to identify midden deposits suitable for further investigation but also in order to obtain dating for the settlements. The results confirmed earlier indications that a very large number of farm sites in Mřvatnssveit were abandoned in the 12th and 13th centuries,3 but they also brought to light clear evidence of very early – pre ~940 – occupation of a surprisingly high number of sites. The fieldwork in 2010 was planned to follow up on these indications; to increase the sample size by obtaining dates from more sites in Mřvatnssveit and to extend the survey area by including sites in the upper reaches of Reykjadalur, which adjoins Mřvatnssveit on the western side. Seven sites, four in Mřvatnssveit and three in Reykjadalur were investigated by trenching but in addition Viking age dates were obtained for a boundary wall in Sell÷nd at the SE margins of Mřvatnssveit and a probable farm in Svartßrkot. The latter site is in the highland interior some 27 km south of Lake Mřvatn and belongs to the district of Bßr­ardalur. It was targeted partly on rescue grounds, to assess the rate of erosion from lake Svartßrvatn, but also to see if sufficient midden deposits remained for further investigation. [More details about this project.]

Beinafundur vi­ Glerß Ý KrŠklingahlÝ­ [PDF 0.1 MB]
Human bones were revealed in a gravel mine close to the farm Glerß in Akureyri. The site was investigated by archaeologists and was found to be some 160 m away from an alleged church site called Kirkjuhˇll (Chapel Mound). The bones could possibly derive from a pagan burial although nothing was found to prove that. The Chapel Mound was at this point not estimated in any danger due to the gravel mining. [More details about this project.]

Bj÷rgunaruppgr÷ftur ß lˇ­ VaktarabŠjar vi­ Gar­astrŠti Ý ReykjavÝk. Eftir [PDF 2.2 MB]
Excavation was required prior to the reconstruction of the house VaktarabŠr, orginially built in the mid 19th century, close to the center of ReykjavÝk underbneath and around the house down to a depth of 0,8 m. Several structural elements were revealed, some of which are associated with the house but others most likley belong to an earlier turf-house which is visible on a ReykjavÝk map from 1836. A part of a midden from that time was excavated but had been truncated by later remains. [More details about this project.]

Bj÷rgunaruppgr÷ftur Ý landi Nausta ß Akureyri (Framvinduskřrsla I) [PDF 2.3 MB]
The excavation at Naust took place after evaluation trenches had been dug. The work was carried out in advance of building development. Two areas were excavated, A and B. A structure in area A, probaly a smithy, shows clear signs of iron working as early as the 10th-11th centuries judging by charcoal and slagrich layers. A spearhead, dated to the 10th-11th centuries was discovered. Later remains on top of smithy were some kind of dug-down features, possibly used to store hay, but those were not dateable. Results from area B were not final when the report came out. However it was observed that remains of structures could date from the 11th-16th centuries judging by tephra. The structures are most likely outhouses of some sort. [More details about this project.]

Bj÷rgunaruppgr÷ftur Ý landi Nausta ß Akureyri (Skřrsla II) [PDF 2.3 MB]
When the previous report on excavations in Naust was published, only limited results from area B were available. This report therefore focuses on area B, roughly about 600 m2 in size. Remains excavated dated from the 11th century to modern times, 19th-20th centuries. The area had been disturbed, most likely by the leveling of the homefield. Most recent was a midden, dated by finds. It was preceeded by several phases of buildings more or less in continuous use at least from the 11th- 16th centuries. Most are interpreted as outhouses although one could have been used as a dwelling at some point. The oldest remains are pinholes, pits and postholes but the function of those is not clear. [More details about this project.]

Continued Excavations at the Farm Mound at Eyri, ═safj÷r­ur [PDF 2.4 MB]
In 2003 trenching took place at the farm mound of Eyri in ═safj÷r­ur. The aim was to evaluate the scientific potential of the site for possible further excavation. This was done by estimating the extent of the mound and the preservation of organic remains. Three trenches were excavated. The farm mound seems to be well preserved. Walls were located and a possible smithy on a smaller mound next to the farm mound. Finds retrieved date to the 19th century. [More details about this project.]

Evaluation of Archaeological Features at Brekka and Da­asta­ir, N˙pasveit in Íxafjar­arhreppur - Evaluation report [PDF 0.4 MB]
Evaluation trenching took place prior to road construction in Da­asta­ir and Brekka, N˙pasveit (NE Iceland) in two sites, several kilometres apart. The trench in Da­asta­ir revealed a stone constructed revetment, the part of an old track. No dating evidence was found. The results from the other trench were negative, no archaeology was found although a sheephouse in the area is known from written sources. [More details about this project.]

Excavations at A­alstrŠti, 2003 [PDF 3.6 MB]
During excavation in A­alstrŠti in 2001 a well preserved Viking Age hall was uncovered. The decision was taken to preserve it in-situ and to construct a public exhibition space around the extant remains. This decision required a sensitive re-design of the proposed development – including the re-routing of several major services (water, electricity and sewerage) - and this process itself necessitated additional archaeological work. Excavation in 2003 revealed a small ancillary building attached to a doorway in the eastern wall of the Viking period hall, together with internal paving, floor layers and a possible external midden. The ancillary building is interpreted as a porch or anteroom for the main entrance. The fragmentary remains of 18th and 19th buildings and deposits were also excavated, towards the western limit of the excavation area – although these had been substantially truncated by modern cellarage. A large assemblage of early modern / modern artefacts were recovered from these layers. [More details about this project.]

Excavations at Gßsir 2001-2006 - A Preliminary Report [PDF 4.1 MB]
This report summarizes the results of excavation in Gßsir between 2001-2006. The excavation area exceeds 1170 m3. The work in area A (booths) focused upon the remains of two clusters of sunken buildings, or “booths”, divided by a path or track way. All excavated layers in area A postdate tephra from 1300. No concrete evidence has been found for any activity later than 1400AD, although a small group of artefacts could possibly date from the 15th century. The church at Gßsir (Area B) was fully excavated along with the graveyard. No graves were found. The church itself had three building phases and is interpreted as a merchants’ church, built by the merchants who carried out trade at Gßsir, for their own spiritual needs and to impress on their Icelandic customers their wealth, magnanimity and commitment to the Iceland trade. The earliest phase of the church predates 1300 and so does the round boundary around it. As such, the excavation at Gßsir represents an exceptional sample of material from a short time period, and from a unique site. The high or late medieval period is severely under-represented in Icelandic archaeology, as is the archaeology of Eyjafj÷r­ur. [More details about this project.]

Excavations at Gßsir 2003 - A Preliminary Statement [PDF 1.3 MB]
This is a preliminary statement handed in to KristnihßtÝ­arsjˇ­ur and gives a summary of the work in 2003. Work at Gßsir in 2003 has focused on a large open area excavation immediately to the west of the area examined in 2002. The total area now under investigation is approximately 600m▓, and is characterised by exceptionally complex archaeological structures and deposits up to 2m deep. A number of extremely well preserved buildings have now come to light, along with a sizeable and important assemblage of medieval artefacts. In addition, exploratory work has been carried out on a number of outlying structures. The work completed so far at Gßsir already represents an unparalled source of information about the nature and extent of this unique and internationally important site. [More details about this project.]

Excavations at Gßsir 2003 - An Interim Report [PDF 1.5 MB]
The work in 2003 focused chiefly on a large open area excavation immediately to the west of the area examined in 2002 so the total area now under investigation is approximately 600 m2, up to 2 m deep. Excavation revealed the well preserved remains of a number of sunken featured buildings, believed to date to the 14th and possibly also the early 15th centuries. Substantial quantities of post-abandonment deposits were removed, revealing a complex sequence of occupational layers, including floors, hearths, paths, entrances and a putative "industrial" area. Additionally, trial excavation was carried out upon a number of outlying structures, in order to clarify their dating, function and possible association with the main ruin group. Excavation recovered a wide range of artefactual evidence, including items of slag, iron, copper alloy, pottery, stone, bone, horn and ivory. [More details about this project.]

Excavations at Gßsir 2004: An Interim Report [PDF 2.8 MB]
Excavation in 2004, the fourth season of a six year project in Gßsir, achieved a number of important goals. Area A revealed for the first time floors and pits undamaged by previous excavators. Several sunken featured buildings were excavated and are by no means the earliest remains at this location as tehy are all dug down through the remains of early occupation. Excavation in area B was commenced by opening a 465 m2 area witin a circular earthwork that demarcates the churchyard on the surface. In addition a 4 m long trench was excavated through the churchyard wall on its NW side. This revealed the stone foundations of a very large church, 16,5 x 5 m, postdating the 1300 tephra. No burials have been located so far. [More details about this project.]

Excavations at Gßsir 2005 - An Interim Report [PDF 1.9 MB]
This season the rooms started in 2003 were completed. It is clear that all structures have been reused many times and reconstructed through time. The development of the site shows that the concentration of booths has been moving east through time. A narrow area previously thought to be a walking path between booths revealed two sunken featured buildings and one of them contained vast amounts of fish bone, which will without doubt shed light on consumption patterns on site. [More details about this project.]

Excavations at Gßsir 2006: An Interim Report [PDF 2.1 MB]
Excavation continued both in area A (booths) and B (church) in this last season of excavation. Results from area B are not presented in this report. Considerable activity was revealed witin A, with many pits and postholes investigated. The rooms excavated have most likle served various functions. One was possibly used for smoking meat/fish as it has many fireplaces and possible chunks of dung. Another room could possibly have been used as a storage. All rooms have several phases of activity. Munch of the western part of Area A was sealed benath the Hekla 1300 horizon. Work also continued on the pathway dividing the area. A test trench from 1986 was opened, revealing partial remains of a building postdating 1300. [More details about this project.]

Excavations at Nauthˇll 2007 - Interim Report [PDF 1.6 MB]
The excavations at Nauthˇll, ReykjavÝk, were conducted following on from an evaluation based on trial trenching in advance of a building development. An area of about 300 m2 was opened up. The excavations revealed a stone built enclosure attached to a farm structure. In addition elements of the homefield boundary were excavated and recorded. There were also some indications of an earlier phase of activity prior to the construction of the enclosure and the structure, though these were fragmentary and not well preserved. The structure and enclosure probaly date from the mid to late 19th century. [More details about this project.]

Excavations at Sk˙tusta­ir, Mřvatn Northern Iceland: Preliminary Field Report After the Excavation Season June – July 2010 [PDF 5.7 MB]
In 2007 a joint FS═/CUNY NABO team, conducting a coring and test trenching survey, visited Sk˙tusta­ir following the discovery of a patch of eroding midden, noted by ┴rni Einarsson ( of the Mřvatn Research Station). Investigations in 2008, lead by Agusta Edwald and Thomas H. McGovern, followed up on the 2007 results with a set of test trenches. The three 2008 test units (D, E1&2, and F) located midden deposits with excellent organic preservation and multiple tephra horizons. Artifacts recovered and tephra observed in area D indicate that the deposits sampled date from ca. 1717-1477, E1 & 2 have an early Viking Age deposit directly upon the Landnßm surface, and F revealed a very rich early modern midden deposit and an unexpected structural wall. The 2009 season saw a major expansion of the area D unit into two connected larger units G (13 sq m) and H (20 sq m). Unit G was carried-out down to lava bedrock, revealing an exceptionally productive Viking Age midden deposit packed into the natural fissures and crevices. Large artifact and eco-fact collections were recovered from the early modern and Viking age deposits, with excellent conditions of preservation throughout. [More details about this project.]

Excavations at Sk˙tusta­ir, N. Iceland 2013 Preliminary Report [PDF 12.2 MB]
The purpose of the 2013 excavation was to recover additional animal bone, artifacts and botanical samples - from the Middle Ages, roughly AD 1000-1500. To accomplish this, an excavation area E4, a 5 x 5 m trench, was opened adjacent to a previous area E3, investigated in 2010. It was hoped that the new area E4 would contain a continuation of the same deposits of previously found material dating to the Middle Ages. Midden material including animal bone, hearth sweepings, discarded household objects, and discarded turf from this phase were indeed identified and samples revocered. Density of anthropogenic debris increased below the V1477 tephra. In addition, collapsed turf and stone structural remains were encountered and were left unexcavated - their disuse was provisionally, albeit broadly, dated to before the fall of the 1410 Vei­iv÷tn volcanic tephra. An additional test excavation area was opened, Area I, which was a 2 x 3 meter test trench slightly to the south of the hillcrest and of interest because of the dense Early Modern material present. Both excavation areas were exclusively targeting midden material including samples of bone, archaeobotanical remains and artifacts and successfully recovered samples from every phase. The confirmation of the presence of a structure at least as old as the Middle Ages provides a potential subject for future field investigations. [More details about this project.]

Excavations at Ůingvellir 2004: A Preliminary Report [PDF 1.9 MB]
Research in Biskupshˇlar, Ůingvellir, was continued in 2004 by enlarging the area to the south. Fragments of several temporary structures were revealed, each of which may have undergone numerous episodes of repair and reconstruction. Positive dating evidence was limited but most artefacts are post-medieval. Open area excavation also commenced at Mi­mundat˙n - an area that has been the subject of tree plantation - of about 40 m2. The uppermost elements of a turf and stone construction were revealed, seemingly the part of a room or a building. These efforts are seen as merely scratching the surface of the archaeology in Ůingvellir and raising more questions than answers. A surface model was made of the assembly site in ŮIngey, S-Ůingeyjarsřsla using a DGPS station. [More details about this project.]

Fieldwork at Vatnsfj÷r­ur, NW-Iceland 2005 [PDF 3.2 MB]
This season (2005) saw the completion of the excavation of the Viking Age longhouse, called Area 1. Some interesting elements were revealed, f.ex. that gravel had been used in between turf layers in the walls whereas stones would have been a better building material - which could suggest that the settlers had recently arrived. The structure has been dated to the early 10th century based on C14 analysis. Another structure SE of the skßli was also the target of investigation. [More details about this project.]

Fluorine poisoning in victims of the 1783-84 eruption of the Laki fissure, Iceland. Eystri ┴sar & B˙land ┐ pilot study excavation report [PDF 0.7 MB]
Two graveyards were the targets of excavation: Eystri ┴sar and B˙land. Test pits were excavated first in order to locate graves of the correct date, using tephra. Two skeletons were excavated in Eystri-┴sar but judging from finds they post-date the eruption by at least 50 years. Only one skeleton was retrieved from the graveyard in B˙land. No signs were found of fluorosis in any of the skeletons. [More details about this project.]

Forn kirkja og grafreitur ß Ne­ra ┴si Ý Hjaltadal 1999 [PDF 0.2 MB]
The aims of the 1999 excavation were to complete the earliest phase of the church in Ne­ri ┴s and to reveal and map graves around it. The earliest church was built soon after the year 1000 and made solely from wood. It was rebuilt at least twice and had turf walls added to it before it burnt down in the late 13th century and the site was reused as a smithy . A total of 83 graves were revealed and it is speculated that the total number could be around 100. The graveyard most likely fell out of use soon after the 1104 tephra was deposited as only two graves clearly postdate it. This is linked to the establishment of a bishopry in Hˇlar. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifak÷nnun a­ ┌tskßlum [PDF 1.4 MB]
Investigations in the area in and around the farm mound in ┌tskßlar continued due to more construction work. Three areas were investigated by trenching and all had some cultural layers, different in extent. The earliest finds retrieved date to the 18th or 19th centuries. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifak÷nnun a­ ┌tskßlum, Gar­i [PDF 0.3 MB]
Archaeological evaluation took place at the site of the farm mound in ┌tskßlar due to building construction plans. An old truncation (ca. 3 x 4 m) was cleaned and cultural remains recorded. Several structural remains were uncovered, belonging to at least three different building phases. Dating for the different phases was not established but pottery retrieved from the fill dated to the 18th-19th centuries. It was recommended that a larger area would be excavated prior to the construction of a new house. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifak÷nnun vegna vegaframkvŠmda vi­ Arnˇrssta­am˙la [PDF 1.8 MB]
Test trenches were excavated in ruins close to a planned road. The aim was to acquire dating evidence and see if older phases were present. The structure was an enclosure of some sort with smaller buildings, one of them possibly a sheephouse, attached to it. Walls clearly postdate tephra deposited in 1875 an no earlier phases were seen. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifak÷nnun vi­ A­alstrŠti 10 [PDF 0.8 MB]
Trial trenches were excavated in advance of building construction on the western side of an upstanding house in A­alstrŠti 10, central ReykjavÝk. The aim was to see whether archaeological deposits were present in this area known to be rich of remains from both the 18th century and Viking Age. Only brick and roof tile fragments were found, most likley deriving from the house present today. Most trenches showed signs of 20th century truncation. However some undisturbed midden layers were found in the western part of the area, the uppermost part dating to the 20th century judging from finds. It was recommended that these should be removed by archaeologists. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifak÷nnun ß Glerß 2007 [PDF 1.0 MB]
The investigation of the badly disturbed graveyard in Glerß continued. A section previosly recorded had revealed cultural layers . The aim was to excavate this area end see if the graveyard was stretching further to the west. Secondly a disturbed mound of earth was examined to retrieve bones despite limited research potential as it is not acceptible to have human bones scattered around. Thirdly see if any bones were still left on the top of che churchmound. Some cultural remains were found in the extended area, all earlier than the tephra from 1300 AD. Fifteen human bones were retrieved from the disturbed mound. A part of one skeleton was found in situ on the top of church mound, which is now fully excavated. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifak÷nnun ß Hˇlsfj÷llum - Bakkasta­ir og ŮrŠlager­i [PDF 1.0 MB]
Trenches were excavated at two alleged farmsites in Hˇlsfj÷ll. The area lies at about 350-450 m above sea level and is one of the highest inhabited areas in Iceland. Regular stone foundations were found at the surface in Bakkasta­ir but the site seems to be so badly eroded that it could not be dated and no substantial remains were found in the trench. Three trenches were dug at ŮrŠlager­i which has four visible ruins. Those are possibly as early as 10th century according to tephra. These results are valuble and the area is promising for further research regarding the settlement history of the area. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifak÷nnun ß Lˇ­ "VaktarabŠjar" vi­ Gar­astrŠti 23 [PDF 0.9 MB]
In relation to the renovation of VaktarabŠr, an old house in central ReykjavÝk, it was considered necessary to machine-dig a trench too see if any archaeology was present. Features were discovered soon and the trench cleaned and recorded: a paved surface of some sort and a coal-rich layer. Finds date to the 19th-20th centuries. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifak÷nnun ß M÷­ruv÷llum, 2005 [PDF 0.5 MB]
A long trench (15 x 2 m) was excavated in the graveyard in M÷­ruvellir, H÷rgßrbygg­, as it was planned to lay heating pipes to the church and therefore a trench had to be excavated. Several remains were found, structural elements, debris and cuts, most likely graves. A midden was detected in the western part at a depth of about 30 cm. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifak÷nnun ß Rau­uskri­u Ý A­aldal 2003 Fornleifastofnun [PDF 1.0 MB]
A small archaeological investigation was conducted in an enclosed area in Rau­askri­a, S-Ůingeyjarsřsla, believed to be a graveyard and scheduled as such. Written sources mention a church on the farm in 1480 but it had apparantly gone out of use in the early 18th century. The place was thought to be of special value for church archaeology, mainly because of its unusual location, some 160 m away from the farm and because no structure could be detected on the surface, possibly pointing to a timber structure of medieval origin. The aim was to detect the church foundations and to shed light on the preservation of human bone. Two trenches were dug where the church could be expected but he results were unexpected: No ruin was found and no graves and in fact the enclosure isn´t a graveyard but most likely an enclosure around cultivation of some sort. The soil showed clear evidence for cultivation but no tephras were present to determine the age of the structure. Most likley the original graveyard is long forgotten and disappeared and judging by written sources the enclosure could be from the 18th or early 19th centuries. It has probably not been used repetedly but rather represents a single experiment. This raised new questions about the possible location of the church in Rau­askri­a. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifak÷nnun ß framkvŠmdasvŠ­i fyrirhuga­s Dettifossvegar: Tˇveggjarstekkur, HrŠrekssta­ir og MarÝuger­i [PDF 5.2 MB]
26 evaluation trenches were excavated in three alleged farm sites in N-Ůingeyjarsřsla in advance of road construction planning. The sites are: HrŠreksstekkur, Tˇveggjarstekkur and MarÝuger­i. A few trenches revealed no occupational layers but many were dug through boundaries predating tephra from 1477 or even 1300. An oblong structure in MarÝuger­i requires further excavation. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifak÷nnun ß lˇ­inni Hßsteinsvegi 8, Stokkseyri [PDF 0.3 MB]
Prior to construction work two trial trenches were excavated in a mound in Stokkseyri, thought to be a possible farm mound. Extensive cultural layers were revealed, all of which postdate tephra from Katla 1500 AD. In the uppermost layers the remains of a concrete foundation was found. This is probably the old farmmound of Vestra-═rager­i, first mentioned in the early 18th century. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifak÷nnun ß r÷sku­um grafreit ß Glerß [PDF 4.9 MB]
Investigation took place at the site of Kirkjuhˇll (Church Mound) in Glerß, Akureyri, after it became clear that it had been greatly damaged by gravel mining. Human bones were scattered over the disturbed area and a substantial amount of bones were also discovered within a mound of soil that had been pushed into the gravel mine. The damage was estimated, a part of the mound (1%) excavated to count the bones and remaining sections recorded. Additionally trial trenches were excavated to see whether undisturbed graves remained. A wall predating tephra from 1300 was recorded. A human bone was dated to around 1000 +/-40 BP with C14. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifak÷nnun ß verb˙­arleifum ß Gufuskßlum, SnŠfellsnesi - Brß­abirg­askřrsla [PDF 3.4 MB]
In 2008 the focus of investigations at Gufuskßlar, a well known fishing station, were three badly eroded mounds close to the shore line. The aim was to clean the profiles and cast light on the nature of the remains, preservation etc. Four profiles were cleaned and recorded. It is clear from the results that all three mounds contain substantial cultural remains. Many finds were retrieved although none were useful in the dating process - except a chess pice, retrieved from the bottom of one section, dated roughly to the 14th-15th centuries. Tephras were not of any help as can be expected for this part of the country. Faunal remains are in excellent condition. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifak÷nnun Ý HrÝsey, Eyjafir­i [PDF 0.3 MB]
Six trial trenches were dug in B˙­atangi in HrÝsey, Eyjafj÷r­ur, in advance of construction work. Ruins and earthworks were visible on the surface prior to excavation. Some trenches revealed remains from the 20th century, f.ex. remains of concrete floors. The visible earthworks are thought to be remains of 20th century construction work. No remains of booths were found and it is possible that the place-name points to structures which were timber built and completely removed after they fell out of use. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifak÷nnun Ý Hvolst˙ni [PDF 0.2 MB]
The ruin was discovered when archaeological survey was conducted due to development plans. It is round, some 32 m in diameter and has been leveled at some point. A trench, 5 x 1 m, was excavated through an alleged wall. No structure was revealed but a round negative feature has been dug at some point and has later filled up with soil. The earthworks visible on the surface show the edge of this trench. No dating was established and the function of the structure remains unclear. It is however pointed out that it is in some ways similar to other round structures that have been partly excavated in the homefield of Nes in Seltjarnarnes. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifak÷nnun Ý Landi ┌lfarsßr [PDF 1.2 MB]
Six evaluation trenches were excavated in three different sites in advance of construction plan in ┌lfarsßrdalur, ReykjavÝk: An outhouse, an enclosure and a boundary. All structures are most likely 20th century, judging by tephra, finds and visibility on the surface. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifak÷nnun Ý Laugarnesi [PDF 0.9 MB]
One trench revealed the remains of a turf wall around the graveyard, post-dating 1500, lying further to the north than the one visible on the surface. Another trench showed evidence of agricultural activity within the homefield and yet another one revealed midden layers, heavily truncated by 20th century pipelines. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifak÷nnun Ý landi H÷gnasta­a ß Fl˙­um Ý Hrunamannahreppi [PDF 0.6 MB]
Trenches were dug in H÷gnasta­ir, Fl˙­ir, prior to construction plans. 10 trenches were machine-excavated out of which six revealed cultural layers. Three trenches revealed possibe structures, most likely outhouses of some sort, dated to the early 16th to the 20th centuries - the youngest structure still visible on the surface. One trench contained cultural layers down to a depth of 1,5 m, all later than tephra from 1389 AD. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifarannsokn a gar­l÷gum Ý landi Ůverßr Ý Íxarfir­i [PDF 21.0 MB]
Archaeological assessment was carried out in the land of Ůverß, Íxarfj÷r­ur, in advance of road construction plans. Five trenches were dug through two separate bits of boundaries. The two separate boundaries are probably remains of one structure although it cannot be confirmed due to erosion. Both proved to be later than tephra deposited in 950 but fell out of use before the 1262 tephra was deposited. Both were turf built. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifarannsˇkn a­ Hofst÷­um Ý Ůorskafir­i [PDF 1.1 MB]
Hofsta­ir in Ůorskafj÷r­ur has for a long time been of interest to antiquarians and archaeologists because of ruins and place names connected to a heathen temple. Two ruins in the homefield were the subject of excavation. One is the alleged temple, the other so called "Chapel Mound" (BŠnh˙shˇll), previosly thought to be the temple. The aim was to estimate the preservation, function and possibilities for further research as well as to establish dating, if possible. In Chapel Mound a structure was revealed as well as graves. No dating was established but written sources do not mention a church on the farm. The alleged temple, on the list of scheduled sites at the National Heritage Agency, on the other hand proved to be nothing but a natural formation and no occupational layers were revealed. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifarannsˇkn undir bŠjardyrum og g÷ngum Ý torfŠnum Ý Laufßsi [PDF 0.3 MB]
The old farm of Laufßs, Eyjafj÷r­ur, is under the supervision of the National Museum. In the autumn of 1999 it was planned to add modern heating to the house by laying a heat-pipe under the passage floor. A trench was excavated along the whole passage, 22 m long and up to 75 cm wide. 18th and 19th century layers were rich with glass and pottery but earlier contexts contained more textiles. Bones were badly preserved. No evidence were found to prove that the length of the passage had changed through time and the passage was built on undisturbed soil, possibly as early as the 16th century, based on written sources. Underneath the passage floor earlier structures with other directions were seen but dating was difficult - they might be from the 9th-10th centuries. It was surprising to find how shallow the cultural layers under the passage are, within half a meter while many farm-mounds are up to 3 m deep. This caused speculation on how farm mounds build up in different ways. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifarannsˇkn ß Steinboga Ý Mřvatnssveit 2002 [PDF 1.4 MB]
A part of the site Steinbogi, Mřvatnssveit, was threatened by imminent roadworks and the investigation in 2002 involved two stages. First the archaeological potential of the threatened part of the site was assessed using surface modelling, geophysical prospection and trenching. All this confirmed the anomalous nature of earthworks previously identified as archaeological features but did not find evidence for further structural remains. Three trenches uncovered structural remains: a field boundary built after c. 950 and before 1158 in trench I, and building remains, ruined before 1300 in trenches II and V (areas E and B respectively). After the archaeological nature of the anomalies in areas E and B had been confirmed it was decided to undertake excavations of these as they were due to disappear under the new road. In area E a part of a building, divided in three cells was uncoverd. This building, believed to have been built in the 10th or 11th c. is interpreted as a sheephouse. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifarannsˇkn Ý Vatnsfir­i vi­ ═safjar­ardj˙p 2004 [PDF 0.7 MB]
The aim in 2004 was to fully excavate the Viking Age skßli, previously located by trenching. Two building phases were detected. The original skßli was around 16 x 6 m, built in ca. 900-950 judging by a Viking Age bead found in the floor. The structure was reduced by 6 m in ca. 950-1000 AD. Coring took place in the homefield close to the skßli and revealed thick, charcoal rich cultural layers in every single core. Northeast of the skßli they were accompanied by reddish peat ash which could point to a midden. The coring results point to very extensive archaeology in an area of at least 200 x 100 m large. The dating of the skßli is interesting in the light of previous theories of landnßm in the Westfjords. It has been maintained that the Westfjords were only colonized when no feasible agricultural land was left in Iceland. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifarannsˇkn Ý Vatnsfir­i vi­ ═safjar­ardj˙p sumari­ 2003 [PDF 0.7 MB]
This is a preliminary report about the archaeological survey and excavation which took place in Vatnsfj÷r­ur in 2003. Four trenches were excavated to estimate the archaeological potential. One trench was put through the farm mound and showed good preservation of cultural layers. Three trenches were excavated in the homefield and all of them revealed well preserved structures, possibly from the 10th century which give an exceptional opportunity to dive into old data without having to dig through many phases of occupation. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifarannsˇknir ß DeiliskipulagssvŠ­i Ý Leirvogstungu, MosfellsbŠ (Framvinduskřrsla II) [PDF 0.8 MB]
Investigation in Leirvogstunga prior to building construction continued. A 25 m long trench in the farm mound, an old truncation from a torn down byre, was cleaned and recorded to estimate the extent of cultural remains and mark the limits of the mound. The trench revealed occupational layers that seem to date mostly to the 19th and 20th centuries. These results forced the construction team to replan the layout of pipes, which in turn demanded five additonal test trenches north and west of the farm mound. No additional archaeology was found. Following this, top soil was taken off the farm mound with a machine in advance of road construction. It was decided by The National Heritage Agency that full excavation was needed prior to further construction work. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifarannsˇknir ß DeiliskipulagssvŠ­i Ý Leirvogstungu, MosfellsbŠ (Framvinduskřrsla III) [PDF 6.8 MB]
This season in Leirvogstunga (2007) saw an extensive excavation of a part of the farm mound. An open area excavation was started, revealing the remains of a total of 32 structures, none of which were dwellings and it is suggested that those lie further to the west in the mound. Some of the buildings were badly truncated by later construction work. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifarannsˇknir ß Eyri vi­ Skutulsfj÷r­ 2003 [PDF 0.8 MB]
Archaeological evaluation was carried out at the site of the farm mound in Eyri, ═safj÷r­ur, abandoned in 1870. Three trenches were excavated. Extensive archaeological remains were revealed and represented a single phase of mid to late 19th century activity. The nature and date of the deposits found suggest excellent potential for preservation of earlier remains on the site. Further substantial excavations are therefore thought to be both possible ad desireable. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifarannsˇknir ß tˇft ß Bangast÷­um og gar­lagi Ý Valadal ß Tj÷rnesi 2002 [PDF 0.5 MB]
A research was undertaken in advance of construction work, namely the building of a new road in Tj÷rnes, NE-Icland. Prior to this archaeological survey had taken place and revealed two sites that the National Heritage Agency wanted excavated before the construction work started. The project was twofold: A small ruin was partly excavated and an earthwork, serving as a boundary marker between properties was trenched. The ruin was not previously known from written sources. It is clearly later than the 1477 tephra as it can be seen within the building turf and most likely it dates to the 16th-17th centuries judging from soil accumulation. The function of the ruin is not clear but it was considered most likely to be a sheep-fold of some sort, possibly related to a nearby stekkur, which was used to seperate lambs and ewes in the spring. The boundary was clearly built after the deposition of the landnßm tephra but fell out of use long before 1300 as it is sealed by a tephra deposited that year. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifarannsˇknir Ý Nesi vi­ Seltj÷rn I - Skřrsla um uppgr÷t 1995 [PDF 0.5 MB]
It was verified by trenching that a ruin, visible on the surface, is most likely the last church in Nes. However a licence to excavate the ruin itself could not be obtained. A graveyard wall and graves close to it were revealed, all most likely 18th century remains. It is interesting that the ruin is not in the center of the graveyard, possibly indicating a different location for previous churches. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifarannsˇknir Ý Nesi vi­ Seltj÷rn V. Skřrsla um formleifauppgr÷tt Ý t˙ni vi­ Nesstofu [PDF 0.9 MB]
The aim of the investigations in 1996 was to explore ruins in the homefield of Nes, including mysterious, leveled out round enclosures discovered from the air. Test pits were excavated in a few of those but no clear evidence was found for their function although it can be ruled out that they were dwellings or animal enclosures as no surface layers were evident. The enclosures are most likely built soon after the Landnßm tephra was deposited in 871 +/-2. It is suggested that they could relate to cultivation of some sort. In addition two parallel walls, a possible house, were excavated but proved to be nothing but insignificant turf walls. The homefield boundary was also trenched and both are dated to an early age by tephra (post LNL, pre K-1500). [More details about this project.]

Fornleifarannsˇknir Ý S-Ůingeyjarsřslu 2006 [PDF 1.6 MB]
This report contains results of investigations carried out in coopperation with Hi­ ■ingeyska fornleifafÚlag (The Archaeological society in Ůingeyjarsřsla) in 2006. 1. Excavation in Litlu-N˙par continued. Three trenches were excavated. Two of them were dug into oblong ruins which both postdate the 950 tephra and had fallen out of use long before the 1477 tephra was deposited. Neither seems to be a dwelling. The third trench was in a smaller ruin, possibly still in use after a tephra from 1104/1158 was deposited. This was interpretded as a possible barn. 2) Investigations started in an alleged assembly site in Skulda■ingsey, adjacant to another well known assembly site in Ůingey, previously test trenched. Two fourths of a ruin, interpreted as a probable booth (temporary structure) were excavated. It postdates tephra from 950 AD but fell out of use long before 1477. 3) A survey was continued in the deserted valley of Ůegjandadalur. 4) Boundaries in Narfasta­ir were trenched two places in connection with a project about an extensive system of medieval earthworks. One was dated to 871-1158 and another to 1300-1477. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifarannsˇknir Ý S-Ůingeyjarsřslu 2007 - Samantekt um vettvangsrannsˇknir ß Ůegjandadal, A­aldal og Reykjadal [PDF 2.9 MB]
This report contains results of investigations carried out in coopperation with Hi­ ■ingeyska fornleifafÚlag in 2007. Excavation in Litlu-N˙par was continued. Previously pagan graves had been discovered and structures dated to the Middle Ages. The investigation focussed on the place where pagan graves had previously been found. A well preserved boatgrave was revealed, marked by the shape of the cut and several boatnails. The remains of at least two individuals were found in the grave which had been robbed. 2. Preliminary excavation was carried out in Ůegjandadalur. A boundary just north of the farm site Einarssta­ir was dated to pre 1300. Four trenches were excavated in the farm site IngirÝ­arsta­ir. A boundary enclosing the homefield predates 1300 and an enclosure attached to it is built after 1200. A round structure thought to be a graveyard wall dates to the mid 13th century. The farm mound however had occupational layers that both pre- and postdate the 1300 tephra - some layers even postdate the 1477 tephra. 3) Pagan graves in Lyngbrekka were continued. Three additional graves, all of which had been disturbed, were successfully located and fully excavated. So far four human burials and two horse burials have been excavated on site. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifarannsˇknir Ý SaltvÝk 2003 [PDF 0.8 MB]
During a general archaeological survey in 2002 three ancient looking ruin clusters were discovered close to the farm SaltvÝk in S-Ůingeyjarsřsla. The aim of this project was to establish a date and estimate the potential for further excavation. Three trenches were excavated. A ruin in the easternmost cluster proved to be a dwelling and is built later than a tephra deposited in 950 and abandoned long before 1477. In one of the other clusters an enlongated sunken featured building with an insunbstantial floor layer was discovered. This had been rebuilt after 950. Thirdly another sunken featured building, possibly a pit house, had long since collapsed when a tephra was deposited in 1300. It is suggested that the area was probably settled early although tephra proves occupation post 950. However some evidence points to a short lived settlement: limited middens and the absence of field boundaries. It is proposed that the site could be a key to understanding the development of settlement in this part of the country. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifaskrßning Ý Hvanneyrarhreppi II: Minjar Ý Siglufir­i (sunnan Siglufjar­arbŠjar og austan fjar­ar), HÚ­insfir­i og Hvannd÷lum Ritstjˇri: Birna [PDF 0.0 MB]
Survey report by Birna Lßrusdˇttir (edt.)2008. Information on the Hvanneyrarhreppur archaeological remains, including a thorough survey of the Siglunes ruins. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifauppgr÷ftur ß K˙vÝkum Ý Reykjarfir­i [PDF 0.5 MB]
A trench was excavated through the center of the midden and revealed a peat-ash rich midden, up to 2 m deep, with well preserved organic material. The oldest layers probably date to the 17th or 18th centuries judging from finds. Some sort of a structure was found under the earliest midden layers but its function can not be established from such a narrow trench. Additionally a test trench was dug east of the location of the main dwellings in an area which has probably been levelled out. Some occupational layers were discovered and the remains of a paved surface sitting in a layer of gravel. The function remains unclear but judging from finds the remains could date to the early 19th century. Around 2000 finds were retrieved, of which only a few predate 1850. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifauppgr÷ftur ß Pßlstˇftum vi­ Kßrahnj˙ka 2005 [PDF 12.6 MB]
In late 2005 ruins in the highlands east of J÷kulsß in Br˙ were excavated - in an area which has now been sunken by Hßlslˇn, a reservoir which stores water for use in hydroelectricity. It has been speculated whether the site could be Reykjasel shieling, mentioned in Hrafnkels saga. This can of course not be verified and now the ruins are often referred to as Pßlstˇftir, named after the man who discovered them. The results are very interesting. Two ruins were revealed, one is simple, thought to be an enclosure for animals, and the other has three rooms with hearths and floor layers. Both are dated to between 950 and 1070. Floor layers in the larger ruin point to seasonal occupation and at this point the site is interpreted as a shieling. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifauppgr÷ftur ß deiliskipulagssvŠ­i Ý Leirvogstungu, MosfellsbŠ (Framvinduskřrsla) [PDF 0.7 MB]
Due to construction plans a total of 11 trenches were excavated in the homefield of Leirvogstunga, MosfellsbŠr in 2006. Cultural remains were found in three trenches and following the decision of the National Heritage Agency two sites were the targets of further investigation. Area A was a dug down feature with stone built walls, interpreted as a barn dating to the 20th century. It is known from oral sources that it was levelled in the nineteensixties. A horse skeleton found on the bottom is probably the remains of a horse named Br˙nn, shot prior to the leveling of the outhouses. Area B (ca. 18 x 14 m)revealed a similar structure, most likley a barn as well - a coin in the floor dated to the early 20th century. Neither trench revealed earlier phases of construction. [More details about this project.]

Fornleifauppgr÷ftur Ý landi Rßeyrar Ý Sk˙tudal [PDF 1.4 MB]
A ruin endangered by road construction in Siglufj÷r­ur was fully excavated. The investigation revealed a structure, most likely an enclosure, divided in two. It is interpreted as "stekkur", a sheepfold used in the springtime to seperate the lambs from the ewes. No dating was established but it is pointed out that the ruin is in the land of Rßeyri, a farm demolished by a landslide in 1830. Additionally a trench was excavated through the wall of another ruin, also considered in danger. No dating was established and the ruin is possibly a haystorage. [More details about this project.]

Fornleigfarnnsˇkn vi­ Ůingvallakirkju [PDF 1.8 MB]
The 1999 excavation revealed that the earliest church foundation, possibly from a wooden church, under the modern church dates to the early 16th century. Geophysical survey was carried out in the corner of the graveyard and soma anomalies found, possibly natural but could be the remains of earlier churches. In addition to these results the remains of a booth were located some 6 m north of the modern church. It had long been abandoned by 1500 but clearly postdates a layer dated by a coin from the 11th century. In addition it was revealed that the soil in the Ůingvellir homefield - at least in the area under investigation - is not "in situ" but has been moved from elsewhere to improve the barren lava before the initial cultivation of the homefield. [More details about this project.]

Fornleigfarnnsˇkn ß Ne­ra ┴si Ý Hjaltadal 1998 [PDF 0.6 MB]
In 1998 the remains of an alleged church ruin and graveyard in Ne­ri ┴s, Skagafj÷r­ur, were excavated. The oldest church revealed this year postdates tephra from 1104 and had been rebuilt several times after it fell out of use as a church, possibly as late as the 16th century, as a smithy and later (prior to 1766) as a sheephouse. The graveyard is built up against a homefield boundary and is shaped as a half-circle. It clearly postdates the homefield boundary but still both were erected before the 1104 tephra was deposited. Over 30 graves have been found and those who can be related to tephras are most earlier than 1104. The oldest church still remains to be excavated. [More details about this project.]

Framvinduskřrsla um Fornleifarannsˇknir Ý Íxney ß Brei­afir­i 2007 [PDF 1.0 MB]
In 2007 Íxney, an island in Brei­afj÷r­ur, was surveyed thoroughly and four trial trenches excavated. EirÝksbŠr, the alleged farm of EirÝkur the red, was the subject of one trench. No substantial floor layers were found and it was assumed that the ruin is an outhouse or a sheep-fold. Additionally a boundary associated with the ruin was trenched and proved to be earlier than the ruin. However neither was dateable due to the lack of finds and tephra. The third trench revealed the wall of a possible outhouse and the fourth one was dug into a part of an irrigation system, most likely recent. Additionally a sample was taken from the area Akranes to look for pollen. [More details about this project.]

Frumrannsˇkn menningarminja Ý Narfasta­aseli [PDF 1.9 MB]
Five trial trenches were excavated in Narfasta­asel to value the nature and date of the archaeology. Written sources first mention a stable farm in 1836 but it was unknown whether the site was settled before that time. Four out of five trenches revealed archaeological features of some sort - two structures and a charcoal pit. Three of them predate tephra from 1300 but the homefield boundary on the other hand is later and most likely dates to the 19th century. [More details about this project.]

Gar­lag ß M÷­ruv÷llum Ý Eyjafir­i - Fornleifarannsˇkn [PDF 0.2 MB]
The results are inconclusive as the boundary could not be dated and no obvious function was established. The boundary is at the upper edge of a natural depression an closes it off to one side. It could possibly be a part of a dam or it could be a part of en enclosure. Three addional test pits were dug close by. Two revealed no cultural deposits but charcoal fragments were found in the third one, later than tephra from 1300 and could point to charcoal production. [More details about this project.]

Gßsir 2002 - An Interim Report [PDF 0.9 MB]
In 2002 an area of about 250 m2 large area (called "A") was opened across the main cluster of booths. The investigation revealed a very complex sequence of remains, representing possibly 10 seperate rooms belonging to at least four phases of construction and in addition a number of external features. A number of hearth features came to light that had no clear relationship to upstanding features, concentrated to the seaward side of the structural remains. One hearth was of special interest as it contained possible remains of sulphur and could have been used in the purification process. Samples were taken for further analysis. All cultural remains excavated so far in Gßsir postdate tephra deposited in 1300 AD. Coring and sampling of the sea-bottom outside of Gßsir was conducted to investigate the possible existance of the survival of a maritime archaeology. The results were negative and most likely the cyclical action of riverine and oceanic currents has removed any such remains. It was proposed that work commenced on undisturbed deposits to the west of the area excavated, additional 400 m2. [More details about this project.]

Gßsir Post Excavation Reports - Volume 2 [PDF 2.4 MB]
As the excavation at Gßsir is now finished extensive post excavation work is underway. Artefact conservation and classificaton, study of faunal and insect remains, analysis of industrial residues and myriads of other detailed analyses of samples and data are important in order to understand the full extent of all the different activities that took place at this important trading site. 2010 see the publication of the Gßsir Post Excavation Reports – Volume 2. [More details about this project.]

HafnarstrŠti 16 - fornleifak÷nnun [PDF 0.3 MB]
During the renovation of an old house in HafnarstrŠti 16 cultural layers were discovered at its foundations in two places, along the southern side and under the northwestern corner. Only the areas at risk was excavated. The layers under the NW corner are probably the remains of an old surface outside the house, most likely prior to 1824 when the house was built at its current length. Old walls under the S-side of the house probably belong to its predecessor, most liklely a house that was in use between 1790 and 1824. [More details about this project.]

Hofsta­ir 1995: Interim Report [PDF 0.2 MB]
The aim of the research in 1995 was to investigate the pit south of the large skßli in Hofsta­ir and try to get a better idea of its date and function. An old trench opened by Daniel Bruun in 1908 was reopened. Judging from tephra the structure was built at the end of the ninth century. A floor layer was discovered at the bottom of the trench, a clear sign of a dwelling but previous excavators had interpreted the structure as either a cooking pit or simply a midden hole. The connection of the pit to the skßli was also investigated and the pithouse proved to be earlier. [More details about this project.]

Hofsta­ir 1996: Interim Report [PDF 0.3 MB]
In 1996 two areas in Hofsta­ir were excavated: The pit house (Area G) and a building adjacant to the SW-corner of the skßli (Area D), interpreted by Daniel Bruun as a storage for objects used in pagan rituals. No finds were retrieved and no floor layer found and therefore the function is still not clear. The building is most likely contemporary with the skßli but postdates the pit-house. Deposits in G seem to reflect two different phases: 1) occupation, 2) abandonment and midden accumulation. [More details about this project.]

Hofsta­ir 1997: Interim Report [PDF 0.2 MB]
The aim of the excavations in 1997 was threefold: 1) To continue the investigation of midden layers in pit-house G. By the end of the season around 1/3 of the midden had been excavated. Preservation of bone and other organic material proved to be excellent. 2) To continue excavation in structures adjacant to the skßli on the SW-corner (D) and NW-corner (E). Results: D is in fact the remains of two different buildings. Only one of them (D2) has been explored and alredy shows clear signs of rebuilding. No function has been established yet. Similarly E is clearly two buildings, one of them most likely contemporary with the skßli. 3) Thirdly to excavate other types of sites near the skßli to try and locate other remains contemporary with the skßli, dating to the 9th-11th centuries. The so called "hestarÚtt" (horse-pen) predates H-1104/1158 and has possibly been used for some kind of cultivation. The homefield boundary predates the 1477 tephra by far. [More details about this project.]

Hofsta­ir 1998: Interim Report [PDF 0.7 MB]
In 1998 the southern end of the skßli was revealed but not fully excavated as the main aim was to look at the connection of the skßli to the buildings D on the southwest corner and pit-house G. Structures were discovered at the SE-corner of the skßli but had been heavily truncated by a possible haystorage dated to the 18th-19th centuries. Excavation of area D, a building adjacant to the SW corner of the skßli, was continued and proved to be even more complex than previously thought. The phases belonging to D clearly date to the 9th-11th centuries. The excavation of area E, a structure adjacant to the skßli close to the NW corner was completed. It clearly postdates the skßli but its function still remains a mystery - at least it is not a dwelling space. Last but not least all midden layers were removed from pit-house G this year. [More details about this project.]

Hofsta­ir 1999: Interim Report [PDF 1.0 MB]
This year (1999) saw the completion in excavating area D, a structure adjacant to the skßli on the SW-corner and area G, a pithouse south of the skßli, now interpreted as a temporary structure, possibly used for weaving. Furthermore excavation continued in areas A and AB which form the S and SE part of the skßli. Area Z, west of the skßli, despite much of its upper horizons having being bulldozed, revealed the remnants of a structure in the position of the chapel and the presence of numerous graves with excellent bone preservation. [More details about this project.]

Hofsta­ir 2001: Interim Report [PDF 1.6 MB]
The main aim of the 2001 season was to fully expose the whole longhouse and to conduct a full scale excavation on the undisturbed layers under Daniel Bruun´s backfill, with an emphasis on removing the floor layer which had been recorded the previous year. The floor was excavated in squares and sampled 100% for flotation. Area C, a structure on top of the northern end of the skßli was completely opened up for the first time. The latest phase is most likely the remains of a 19th century stable but the earliest one could date to the Viking Age. 51 possible graves have been identified in the graveyard (Z) out of which 16 have been excavated. A church ruin was also revealed in 2001. The graveyard wall predates 1300 but some of the graves date to the early 15th century according to tephra. [More details about this project.]

Hofsta­ir 2002: Interim Report [PDF 3.0 MB]
Work on the skßli was concluded and no new areas opened in 2002. The main task was to look at the internal structures of the skßli as the floor layer had already been removed: Postholes and - pads, stone/beam slots. The focus was on structural aspects: How the building was constructed, the internal arrangement of space. Judging from postholes and other structural elements the skßli can be divided into three seperate entities. The excavation of the chapel (called Z) was continued. Two graves were located within the porch but not excavated. It was concluded that the chapel was stave built. No signs of an earlier structure were seen beneath athough it can still not be completely ruled out. Test pits were dug in a levelled area close to the early medieval to modern farm mound in search of a midden. Three test pits were dug and a well stratified cultural deposits seem to be more or less preserved under the levelled surface. Test pits did however not reveal rich concentrations. [More details about this project.]

Hofsta­ir 2003: Interim Report [PDF 0.8 MB]
Excavation in the skßli area was completed the previous year so in 2003 the focus was completely on the chapel and cemetery site called Z. The entire cemetery excavation area from 2001 was reopened and extended 2 m to the north and east to try and find the limit of burials. The aims of this year were threefold. 1) To excavate layers around the chapel, which itself had been completed in 2002. 2) to try and find the limits of the burials to the north and east. 3) to continue the burial excavations. A pit was discovered, probably associated with the post-medieval farm. A total of 12 graves were excavated, two of them within the porch of the church, but around sixty three graves remain unexcavated within the area. Two additional post-holes belonging to the earliest church were excavated and a turf leveling layer from underneath the chapel. [More details about this project.]

Hofsta­ir 2004: Interim Report [PDF 1.0 MB]
This season the entire cemetery excavation area from 2003 was reopened and no extensions made. The aims were twofold: Firstly to investigate the area in the centre of the cemetery to ensure that all features in the area had been investigated and secondly to continue the excavation of the burials. The remains of an earlier structure were found underneath the church face called Z2 but had nearly been erased completely before Z2 was erected. A total of 48 skeletons were excavated and ca. 20 additional graves have been revealed but remain unexcavated. [More details about this project.]

Hringsdalur Ý Arnarfir­i - Fornleifarannsˇkn 2006 [PDF 1.0 MB]
In 2006 human bones were found eroding in Hringsdalur W-Iceland. An excavation was conducted and two pagan burials uncovered, one of which was badly eroded but the other completely undisturbed. The grave goods were unusually rich, among them a shield-boss of a type previously unknown in Iceland. Earlier stories of bone finds in Hringsdalur exist but it was not until now that these could be confirmed. [More details about this project.]

HrÝsheimar 2003 - Interim Report [PDF 1.7 MB]
The heavily eroded Viking Age site of HrÝsheimar site is situated southeast of lake Mřvatn. It had previously been surveyed and test pits showed great potential for further excavation in connection with the Landscape of settlements project. The aims of the 2003 season were a) to excavate areas that were in the process of being eroded, b) to excavate the midden and c) excavate a structure that had partially been excavated in 2001. It came as a surprise how well archaeology below the eroded surface was preserved. Iron ore processing on a large scale was identified in the western part of the now eroded homefield (area A-C), over 20 furnaces and a smithy excavated. Those deposits are dated to the 10th-11th centuries by C14. Midden layers were also excavated in area H- L and the deposit is arguably one of the richest and most important middens in N-Iceland, both in terms of its own antiquity (based on finds) and composition and in terms of its immense value for comparison with the archaeofauna from Sveigakot and Hofsta­ir. A pit house was discovered under a midden in area H. It had two occupational phases but its function still remains unclear. In total just over 200 m2 were excavated. [More details about this project.]

HrÝsheimar 2004 - Interim Report [PDF 0.9 MB]
In 2004 work continued in areas H (a sunken featured building) and L (midden). The aims were to fully excavate the sunken featured building, continue the midden excavations and try and obtain better understanding of its relationship to tephras present on site. The sunken featured building had two occupational phases, one related to the use and the other to its abandonment, apparent by some midden dumping. The preservation of the midden exceeded all expectations. It does not show the same faunal pattern as f.ex. Steinbogi and Sveigakot. Although no clear dating evidence based on tephra is provided in this report it is evident from finds that it dates to the Viking Age. [More details about this project.]

Kuml a­ Ůverß Ý Laxßrdal, TeykdŠlahreppi, Su­ur-Ůingeyarslu [PDF 0.2 MB]
Human and horse bones were discovered in a gravel mine in the land of Ůverß, Laxßrdalur (S-Ůing), first in 1945 and again in 1985. The site was investigated on the surface in 1999 but no further bones or finds were found. The alleged grave could have been destroyed completely but this could only be verified with excavation. [More details about this project.]

Kuml og samfÚlag. Framvinduskřrsla 2003 [PDF 0.7 MB]
Recent research has shown that most pagan graves are found either away from the farm site, close to boundaries between farms or close to the farm. Often they lie close to old tracks. A few suspicious sites were excavated in 2003 to test this model. A pile of rocks in Bjarneyjar, Brei­afj÷r­ur, proved to be a cairn or the remains of a small hut and a mound in Ytri -Fagradalur in Skar­sstr÷nd is most likley a natural formation. A site close to the Viking Age site HrÝsheimar was excavated, and a grave-like oblong depression, with sides lined with stones, revealed. No human remains were present but mysteriously a bone from a dog (dates to 770-890 AD according to C14 analysis) and a bone from a reindeer (not introduced in Iceland until the 18th century) were discovered. This has yet to be explained. Two alleged graves close to another Viking-Age farm, SaltvÝk, were excavated and both proved to be graves, sealed by the 1477 tephra but heavily disturbed by grave-robbers. [More details about this project.]

Kuml ß Da­asta­aleiti Ý Reykjadal. Fornleifarannsˇkn 2004-2005 [PDF 1.2 MB]
In 2003-2005 investigations took place in Lyngbrekka, earlier known as G÷mlu-Da­asta­ir in Reykjadalur, S-Ůing. The aim was to see if folklore and place names could be used as reliable sources to locate pagan burials. The investigations were successful, two graves were excavated and bones from a human, a dog and a horse recovered. The burials were badly disturbed. [More details about this project.]

Kuml Ý SaltvÝk Ý Reykjahverfi, S-Ůingeyjarsřslu [PDF 1.4 MB]
Two pagan burials were excavated close to the farm SaltvÝk in S-Ůingeyjarsřsla in 2003 and 2004. Both had been located during survey in 2002, close to ruins that have been found to date to the Viking Age and close to an old horse track. Both had been heavily disturbed, most likely just before the deposition of the 1477 tephra. The eastern grave has most likely contained a human and a horse at the northern end - or at least some part of a horse. The western one was single. It cannot be ruled out that more graves, disturbed or even undisturbed, remain on site. [More details about this project.]

Kumlfundur ß Kßlfskinni ß ┴rskˇgsstr÷nd. Fornleifarannsˇkn 2006 [PDF 0.5 MB]
In 2003 a few sites in Kßlfskinn, Eyjafj÷r­ur, had been surveyed and identified as possible pagan burials. In 2005 two of those were tested by opening trenches across each concentrations of stones. Both areas produced animal and human bones in a total of four graves, some of which were disturbed. No dating was established but the layout of the graves points to pre-christian. [More details about this project.]

Kumlin hjß Litlu-N˙pum Ý A­aldal. Fornleifarannsˇkn 2004 [PDF 0.8 MB]
Two pagan graves were excavated close to the farm ruins called Litlu-N˙par, S-Ůingeyjarsřsla, in 2004. They were discovered where pagan graves had been found previously by accident in 1915. Grave 1 had been disturbed before the 1477 tephra was deposited. No finds were present but badly preserved bones of a human and perhaps a horse were present. Grave two, also disturbed between the 11th-13th centuries was also in bad shape. It turned out to be divided in two with only a thin wall of soil between. Only one human bone was present in the northern part and the southern one contained horse- and dogbones. [More details about this project.]

K÷nnunarskur­ir vi­ kirkjuna ß Ůingv÷llum [PDF 0.3 MB]
Archaeological evaluation took place at Ůingvellir in advance of construction work to improve access to the church. Three test pits were excavated, intended to determine whether or not the current foundations of the church are dug down to bedrock, and to investigate the structural stability of the church. The church foundation clearly rests upon an earlier layer of stone rubble. One fragment of pottery was dated to the 18th-19th centuries. [More details about this project.]

K÷nnunarskur­ur Ý gar­lag Ý landi EyvÝkur ß Tj÷rnesi [PDF 0.7 MB]
Prior to construction work a trench was excavated through a boundary which clearly predates tephra from 1477 AD but is built later than tephra most likely deposited in 950 AD. [More details about this project.]

Land at Sˇmasta­ager­i and Hraun, Rey­arfj÷r­ur: An Archaeological Evaluation [PDF 3.0 MB]
Targeted trenching of two farm-mound sites revealed limited archaeological remains, mainly from the late 19th-20th centuries although at Sˇmasta­ger­i possible Viking Age or high Middle Ages activity was detected. In addition trenching within the homefield of Sˇmasta­ager­i revealed archaeological depositis at a single location. Further trenching close to the shoreline did not reveal additional sites. Further investigation of both farm mounds was seen necessary. [More details about this project.]

Landscapes of settlement 2002 - Reports on investigations at five medieval sites in Mřvatnssveit [PDF 5.6 MB]
In 2002 a few medieval sites in Mřvatnssveit were trenched in connection with the Landscape of settlements project, with the aim gaining better understanding of how the settlement process evolved. Steinbogi was one of them, but had some structures excavated further due to road construction plans. The homefield boundary in Steinbogi was in use between 950 and 1158 and the farm was most likely abandoned before the 1158 tephra was deposited although some activity is visible after that. A substantial faunal collection was retrieved from a midden, showing an unusual pattern with sheep dominating cattle. It´s not least therefore interesting that a ruin excavated close to the planned road was interpreted as a sheephouse. The second place was Brenna where two parallel boundaries were excavated and both had fallen out of use before 1158. The midden seems to be well preserved. Oddasta­ir south of Sveigakot has homefield boundaries in use between 950-1158, af farm mound settled at the same time and some activity between 1158-1300. Furthermore activity is visible between 1477-1717, but according to written sources the place was inhabited for some time around 1680. The fourth place, St÷ng, was most likely abandoned before 1300 and "vi­ VÝ­iker", a small site, has a homefield boundary that collapsed before 1158. The abandonment of many of the sites can not obviously be explained by environmental factors so explanations must be seeked elsewhere. [More details about this project.]

Landscapes of settlement 2002. Reports on investigations at five medieval sites in Mřvatnssveit [PDF 5.6 MB]
In 2002 a few medieval sites in Mřvatnssveit were trenched in connection with the Landscape of settlements project, with the aim of gaining better understanding of how the settlement process evolved. Steinbogi was one of them, but some structures there were excavated further due to road construction plans. The homefield boundary in Steinbogi was in use between 950 and 1158 and the farm was most likely abandoned before the 1158 tephra was deposited although some activity is visible later. A substantial faunal collection was retrieved from a midden, showing an unusual pattern with sheep dominating cattle. It´s not least therefore interesting that a ruin excavated close to the planned road was interpreted as a sheephouse. The second place trenched was Brenna where two parallel boundaries were excavated and both had fallen out of use before 1158. The midden seems to be well preserved. Oddasta­ir south of Sveigakot has homefield boundaries in use between 950-1158, af farm mound settled at the same time and some activity between 1158-1300. Furthermore activity is visible between 1477-1717, but according to written sources the place was inhabited for some time around 1680. The fourth place, St÷ng, was most likely abandoned before 1300 and "vi­ VÝ­iker", a small site, has a homefield boundary that collapsed before 1158. The abandonment of many of the sites can not obviously be explained by environmental factors so explanations must be seeked elsewhere. [More details about this project.]

Midden Excavation at M÷­ruvellir, and Prospection in H÷rgßrdalur - Interim Field Report (Gßsir Hinterlands Project 2008) [PDF 2.2 MB]
Survey, coring and small scale test excavation on nine selected sites in Eyjafj÷r­ur took place in 2008 in search of medieval midden deposits. Some of them proved to have rich deposits possibly datable to the medieval and early modern periods, especially Skuggi and Myrkßrdalur. The excavation in M÷­ruvellir also continued with the goal of finding faunal materials useful for C14 dating. Bones in lower layers turned out to be badly preserved but textile was in better state. [More details about this project.]

Midden Excavation at M÷­ruvellir, and Prospection in H÷rgßrdalur Interim Field Report Gßsir Hinterlands Project 2008 [PDF 0.0 MB]
In June and August 2008 international teams cooperated in carrying out a program of survey, coring, and small scale test excavation on selected sites in the Eyjafjord region in Northern Iceland. This was the first season of a planned multi-season collaborative investigation of the hinterlands surrounding the medieval seasonal trading center at Gßsir (Roberts 2004; Roberts et al, 2002-2006; Harrison et al 2006 – 2008; Harrison, 2006-2008). [More details about this project.]

Midden Excavations at Sk˙tusta­ir N. Iceland, 2011 [PDF 2.2 MB]
Excavations have been ongoing at the N. Icelandic farm, Sk˙tusta­ir, since 2008 as an outgrowth of the Landscapes of Settlement project. The major objective of the 2011 excavation season at Sk˙tusta­ir was to complete the excavation of an already begun, large Trench, Area H (measuring 8.36 x 4 meters) by continuing the excavation down to the natural bedrock surface. This was completed by a four person team from CUNY and FSI directed by Adolf Fri­rikson, with Francis Feeley, George Hambrecht and Megan T. Hicks (of CUNY, Ph.D. Program in Archaeology). The archaeological deposits encountered contained animal bone, artifacts and were divided by several datable volcanic tephra layers: the V 1477, V1410, H 1104/1158 and the V940, and the V871 were all identified both in the field and reconfirmed in the lab by Magnus ┴. Sigurgeirsson. As in other trenches previously excavated, the late medieval phases directly above and below the V1477 volcanic tephra were nearly entirely void of bone and artifacts. The high medieval phase – above and below the 12th c Hekla volcanic tephra generally rich, culminating in a very dense deposit which lay upon the V940 tephra, context [317]. As always, a program of initiatives outside the excavation enriched the digging season. Gar­ar Gu­mundson (FS═) completed a contour survey of the entire farm mound which will contextualize other GIS features. A small survey was carried out, locating potential remains of Sk˙tusta­ir´s medieval church and churchyard- this was completed using both late 19th c. photographs and modern photography. An annual session of educational programming with KAP═ (Kid´s Archaeological Program, Iceland), included on-site experiences and a mock-excavation for the school age kids in the county. Analysis of artifacts, bones, soils, and archaeobotanical remains is currently underway at the Hunter College Laboratories and Fornleifastofnun ═slands. [More details about this project.]

Ne­ri ┴s Preliminary Excavation Report 1998 [PDF 1.5 MB]
The purpose of the excavation in Ne­ri ┴s was to shed light on a ruin, surrounded by an enclosure, thought to be the site of one of the earliest churches in Iceland according to written sources. Several phases of structures were revealed. An upstanding ruin of a sheep house was removed, revealing an earlier phase of another sheephouse, predating tephra from 1766. An even earlier structure was most likely a smithy, judging from slag and other iron-working remains. Earlier buildings are most likely those of the church, the earliest one predating tephra from 1104 - as did some graves revealed. The only remains that could possibly belong to the oldest church are postholes, pointing to a timber structure. The graveyard boundary proved to be later than the homefield boundary which it is built up against - both however predate 1104. [More details about this project.]

Preliminary Field Report of the 2013 Skuggi and Sta­artunga Excavations in H÷rgßrdalur, Eyjafj÷r­ur [PDF 3.4 MB]
Investigations into the Gßsir Hinterlands and Eyjafj÷r­ur Human Ecodynamics: Preliminary Field Report of the 2013 Skuggi and Sta­artunga Excavations in H÷rgßrdalur, Eyjafj÷r­ur This is a preliminary report on the 2013 field season at Skuggi. The 2013 Skuggi midden and structural excavations are a continuation of work started there in 2008 and 2009. In a continued effort to investigate the long term Eyjafj÷r­ur Human Ecodynamics, an international team cooperated in carrying out a program of survey, coring, and small scale test excavation on selected sites in the Eyjafj÷r­ur region in North Iceland. This past season saw the team picking up from where they had left off after completion of the initial Gßsir Hinterlands Project (GHP) which was part of a planned multi-season collaborative investigation of the hinterlands surrounding the medieval seasonal trading center at Gßsir, partially funded by a NSF International Polar Year (IPY) grant (ARC 0732327), and largely made possibly by a NSF Dissertation Improvement Grant (ARC 0809033) to Harrison, and by Fornminjasjˇ­ur (the Icelandic University Research Grant) to Roberts. Prior work at Gßsir indicated that this medieval (ca. AD 1250 – 1400) trading center was provisioned from a wide economic catchment area and that investigations needed to be extended to include the surrounding landscape (e.g., Roberts 2009, 2010; Harrison 2010, 2013; Harrison et al. 2008, VÚsteinsson 2011). Work conducted in 2013 was supported by a US NSF Comparative Island Ecodynamics Project (CIE) grant (ARC 1202692). [More details about this project.]

Preliminary Report of Archaeological Fieldwork at Svalbard (Svalbardshreppur), 2008 [PDF 1.2 MB]
In 1986 and 1988 midden excavations took place in Svalbar­, N-Ůingeyjarsřsla, revealing one of the largest faunal collections up to that point in Iceland. The results were instrumental in the development of methods and models for reconstructing palaeoeconomies in the N-Atlantic region. In 2008 the Svalbar­ midden was revisited with the aim of refining the stratigraphy and dating, to gather new radiocarbon, geoarchaeological and ecofact samples to supplement landscape history and site fomation reconstructions for the site and for the Svalbard region, and to identify potential locations for further archaeological research. Old midden trenches were reopened in 2008 and one profile moved back to stabilize it. Some sections were redrawn. [More details about this project.]

Presth˙s, Akranes - FramkvŠmdav÷ktun [PDF 0.3 MB]
Due to construction work machine digging up against the farm-mound Presth˙s, Akranes, was monitored by an archaeologist. A section was cleaned and recorded. Cultural layers were up to 1 m thick, consisting of midden and wall collapse. [More details about this project.]

Rannsˇkn ß Sj÷ Fornleifum Sem Fara Undir Hßlslˇn vi­ Kßrahnj˙ka [PDF 8.2 MB]
In 2004 seven archaeolocigal sites, which will be sunken by Hßlslˇn, a reservoir which stores water for use in hydroelectricity, were excavated or recorded. 1) The ruin of a sheperd´s rest hut was fully excavated. It was not dateble by tephra but all finds, mostly related to food and drink, date to the 19th century. 2) A cairn was excavated, erected either in the 13th-14th centuries or late 19th/early 20th centuries. 3) Possible walls some 600 m south of the cairn were trenched and proved to be natural features. 4-5) Two stone built foundations of a ropeway conveyor were excavated and one of them is dated to the 19th century pre 1875. 6) A wall enclosing a natural depression was not dateable with tephra but it is known from oral sources that it was still in use in the mid 20th century. 7) A sheperd´s rest hut still under roof was thouroughly measured, recorded and some trenches were excavated to try and establish a date and observe the nature of the cultural remains. It seems that the oldest part of it has two phases. Finds retrieved are all late 19th century. [More details about this project.]

Report on VÝg­alaug (Consecrated Pool) in Laugardalur [PDF 0.1 MB]
In the year 2000 Icelanders celebrated 1000 years of christianity. This raised interest in historical sites linked to the christianization, including VÝg­alaug (Consecrated Pool) in Laugardalur, a natural hot pool with stonebuilt sides. According to Kristni saga this was the place where people from the south were babtized after the Christianization on their way home from Al■ingi in the year 1000. Local people wanted the pool repaired and prior to that an archaeological investigation was requested. A narrow trench was excavated along the western side of the pool. The pool is built in a natural depression and shows no signs of repairs or changes except on the NW corner where the slope pushes the wall inwards. The pool could not be dated as tephra layers lacked completely. [More details about this project.]

Reykholtskirkja: Fornleifarannsˇkn 2002 [PDF 0.5 MB]
Excavation of the church in Reykholt was started this year. A ruin was visible on the surface prior to excavation south of the current church. A trench, 8 x 5 m was opened across the SE corner of the ruin. The church foundations were revealed along with at least sex graves. Four phases of construction were revealed along with a structure, possibly a passage/tunnel . In connection with the Reykholt excavation geophysical surveys took place in Stafholt where it was thought that earlier phases of churches were in the graveyard. A regular anomaly of high resistance was found in the centre of the survey area, possibly a structure, but this needs to be confirmed by excavation. The survey forms a part of a broader assessment of archaeological prospection techniques in Iceland. [More details about this project.]

Reykholtskirkja: Fornleifarannsˇkn 2003 [PDF 0.5 MB]
In 2003 the church excavation in Reykholt was continued. This season only the latest phase was under investigation, from the church erected in 1835. The outcome of the excavation seems to match written descriptions from the 19th century. 41 graves were located, around and within the church of which 4 were excavated. Remains of older churches are visible in grave sections and await further excavation. [More details about this project.]

RÚtt vi­ B˙­arhßlsvirkjun: Archaeological Investigations [PDF 3.2 MB]
The main findings from the investigations were that the enclosure was built immediately after 1721, and that there is an earlier feature, located in the west stretch of the north wall, that probably dates to after 1636, and which has utilized ie built on and effected the wall construction of the north-west wall of the enclosure. [More details about this project.]

Siglunes Field Report 2011 [PDF 0.0 MB]
Report on the initial excavation season, listing all the ruins and providing profile drawings, matrices, and information on erosion stage of the various structures related to Viking Age and later fishing activities. This report also provides assessment of the structural, archaeofaunal, and artefactual remains. Tephra assessment by M. Sigurgeirsson included. [More details about this project.]

Skßholt 2002: Interim Report No. 1 [PDF 2.0 MB]
Excavation occurred in two areas in 2002: In the NE-part of the farm mound, right south of the church and in a small mound, called Kyndluhˇll (Torch mound) west of the farm mound. Kyndluhˇll is not a well stratified midden as hoped for but consists rather of structural elements, turf collapse and ash dumps. The nature of the mound is still not clear - perhaps it is formed by rebuilt animal shelters. In the farm mound excavation this year began in the area of the school rooms and dormitory, based on an 18th century map. A part of that area had been heavily truncated by a haybarn built in 1902 and the truncation was emptied using a mechanical excavator. Six phases were identified, from modern down to pre c. 1730. Some of the buildings (dormitory, library, bishop´s room) had been heavily used as animal byres after the earhquake. A large quantity of finds was retrieved, f.ex. 136 kg of pottery, glass, metal, stone and animal bone. Preservation of organic remains is good. A contour survey was carried out in the area south and west of the main excavation area, creating a surface model with several earthworks. Furthermore tephra analysis was carried out to estimate which tephra layers were to be expected in the area and geoarchaeological analysis to charachterize the land management and compare it against other farm types. [More details about this project.]

Skßholt 2003: Interim Report No. 2 [PDF 3.8 MB]
In 2003 the excavation area in the farm mound was extended to the west. The new area proved to be far more complex than anticipated due to great truncations and disturbance, mostly by 20th century leveling. Excavation in the area from the previous year was continued end among other things further 17th century remains were investigated in the area where a haybarn was built in 1902. Perhaps the most important revelation is that the 19th century farm as shown on an 1836 plan is in fact simply the northwestern part of the 18th century farm, re-used. Most of the farm buildings were more or less abandoned in the late 18th century. The realization that the 18th century rooms were in fact built on many different levels has ecplained differences in survival and added to the understanding of the spatial layout of The midden south of the farm mound was prospected, cored and trenched. Midden deposits appear to be present over a larte part of the southern slope of the farm mound. They consist primarily of peat-ash, up to 2,5 m deep. Some concentrations of bone middens were located and dated to the 18th century. [More details about this project.]

Skßholt 2004: Interim Report No. 3 [PDF 3.0 MB]
The aims of the season (2004) were to complete the excavations of the eastern side of the settlement back to early 17th century levels, to continue work on the western part and to expand investigations on the midden slope south of the farm mound. Some rare and unusual finds were uncovered, f.ex. a cold coin from the 18th century and a carved gaming piece. Some elements in the settlement have clearly not been shown in maps existing from the 18th-19th centuries, f.ex. in terms of access and movement around the site. Among these is the fact that many rooms on the western wing of the settlement have been gradually closed off from the main passage. Remains pre 1630 have only been seen at the eastern end of the site. Two trenches were excavated in the midden area and layers excavated so far seem to date to the 18th century. [More details about this project.]

Skßholt 2005: Interim Report No. 4 [PDF 5.7 MB]
2005 was the fourth season of excavation in Skßlholt. In the main area, work continued in the western side, previously opened in 2003, as well as in the extension to the south, opened this season. Most of the stuff excavated belongs to phases 3 and 4, ca. 1630/50-1896. The midden area south of the house complex was continued. A trench from previous year was extended to the north but as in previous year did not produce a large number of finds. It was decided to try a more systematic method and continue the midden excavation by digging 2x2 m test pits along the crest of the midden slope at 5 m interval. [More details about this project.]

TRH06 - 07: The Archaeology of ReykjavÝk Water Front - Interim Report [PDF 22.8 MB]
A proposed development area in the center of ReykjavÝk was the subject of archaeological excavations in the winter 2006-2007. The excavation area, which was split up into many different areas, covered about 1405 m2. Beforehand it was clear that some parts of the area were less likely to contain archaeology as they mostly consisted of modern landfill. Therefore areas were treated differently in terms of archaeology.The archaeology excavated consisted mainly of cellars, sea walls and different episodes of landfilling, most dating to the 19th-20th centuries. Old ReykjavÝk maps were of great value to the interpretation and layout of structures but the archaeology provides more resolution to the exsisting historical documents. The material is on the cusp of the legal definition of archaeology - lying between the 100 year rule. This presented several challenges to the archaeologists and the cultural heritage monitors. [More details about this project.]

TRH07: The Archaeology Of Reykjavik Water Front II - Interim Report [PDF 4.2 MB]
The development of the water front area in the mid-ninetheenth century was a pivotal point in ReykjavÝk’s, as well as Iceland’s, history. It represented a move towards Modernism that is reflected in the trade and exchange goods, but also archaeological (and therefore material). The sequences of building and construction were related to the reclamation, the merchants and warehouses, and the northward expansion of the water front c. 1915. At the turn of the twentieth century much of the land under excavation belonged to the Thomsen trade emporium. The onset of reclamation and developments from the mid-nineteenth century to the early-twentieth centuries traced in the excavations adds significant new knowledge concerning the detailing in the sequences of building and the material imprint of this developmental phase in ReykjavÝk’s history. Preservation on the site was good in terms of the stone foundations and occasional organic preservation, though discrete surface and floor deposits were sporadic and diffuse. This report details the main findings from the excavations. [More details about this project.]

The Archaeology of ReykjavÝk Harbour [PDF 1.8 MB]
An archaeological evaluation was carried out on land to the south of ReykjavÝk´s old eastern harbour, between Geirsgata, LŠkjargata, HafnarstrŠti and Pˇsth˙sstrŠti. A total of thirteen trial trenches were located, targeting possible building remains and harbour features such as piers and the seafront. As may be expected these trenches encountered very extensive modern disturbance, modern dumping, pipes, cables, and the concreted basements of modern buildings. Nonetheless, a number of features of potential archaeological interest came to light, particularly within the southern part of the area. Most of the structures are believed to date to the 19th-20th centuries. [More details about this project.]

The Midden at M÷­ruvellir 2006 - Preliminary Excavation Report [PDF 0.6 MB]
An exploratory trenching exercise was carried out in 2006 in the area of the so-called Ash Hill (Ískuhˇll) at M÷­ruvellir in Eyjafj÷r­ur. An area of about 5 x 2 m was excavated. The excavation revealed a well stratified midden with good preservation and a large number of finds most of which date to the 18th-19th centuries. In light of these successes it is proposed that further excavation be undertaken at M÷­ruvellir in 2007. [More details about this project.]

The Midden at M÷­ruvellir 2006 Preliminary Excavation Report [PDF 0.0 MB]
Results from the 2006 Evaluation trench Prior to excavation an area to the west of Stefßnsfjˇs, (the northwestern portion of the extant farm mound) was identified as being the likely historic Ískuhˇll. This area was then assessed by test coring, using a 25mm manual corer. An area 2m in width and 5m in length, located at the western edge of the ash hill was excavated. This trench immediately proved to contain a well preserved and well stratified sequence of bone rich peat ash deposits – and all further work was focused on this trench. Harrison, R. and H. M. Roberts, 2007. [More details about this project.]

The Midden at M÷­ruvellir, 2007 - Preliminary Excavation Report [PDF 1.1 MB]
A midden trench opened in 2006 was extended in 2007 for further investigation. Layers excavated probably date to the 18th-19th centuries although the excavation reached to the depth of 2,5 m below surface. Preservation was good and it is hoped that excavation can continue in the search of medieval midden layers. [More details about this project.]

The Midden at M÷­ruvellir, 2007 Preliminary Excavation Report [PDF 0.0 MB]
Between July 31st and August 10th 2007, FSI and CUNY continued excavation of an evaluation trench begun in the summer of 2006. This aimed at investigating the nature and preservation of faunal remains at the so-called Ash Hill (Ískuhˇll) at M÷­ruvellir, in H÷rgßrbygg­, Eyjafj÷r­ur. [More details about this project.]

The church in Gßsir : Interim report on excavations in 2004 and 2006 [PDF 9.3 MB]
This report contains the results of the church excavation. In 2004 and 2006 an area of about 550 m2 within the graveyard wall was fully excavated down to natural including the church. The church had three phases, all of wooden structures, the youngest one predating the 1300 tephra. The latest church and the graveyard wall were most likely built in the second half of the 13th century. The earliest phase most likely dates to the early 12th century. No graves were discovered in the graveyard but some pits relating to food preparation and industrial activities were excavated. [More details about this project.]

Vatnsfj÷r­ur 2006: Interim Report [PDF 6.6 MB]
The 2006 was the fourth season of archaeological research in Vatnsfj÷r­ur. Three new structures were revealed in the Viking Age area. Excavation commenced in the farm mound, which is believed to have been occupied soon after the Viking Age up to modern times. Trenches were excavated to estimate its extent to plan further excavation. [More details about this project.]

Vatnsfj÷r­ur 2007: Interim Report [PDF 11.2 MB]
In 2007 excavation continued in the Viking Age area. Ruins revealed in previous years were finished, ruin 3 (a smithy) and ruin 4 (a small building with a stone pavement) and yet another ruin (no. 7) was discovered and exposed but not fully excavated. It could possibly date to the Viking Age although this was not verified. Surprisingly animal bones show that wild species only make up to about a third of the fauna in the Viking Age which is not what was expected. An area in the farm mound around 400 m2 was opened and t a large part of the 19th-20th century Vatnsfj÷r­ur farm excavated. It became clear that it had undergone drastic changes from the time it was built in 1884 until it fell out of use in the nineteensixties. [More details about this project.]

Vatnsfj÷r­ur 2008: Interim Report [PDF 7.1 MB]
In 2008 the excavations in both the Viking Age area and the 19th century farm mound in Vatnsfj÷r­ur were continued. Excavations in the Viking age area focused on an outside activity area east of the already excavated ruins. Two deep cooking pits were discovered as well as the poorly preserved remains of a Viking Age structure, where a Viking Age bead was retrieved. [More details about this project.]

Vatnsfj÷r­ur 2009: Framvinduskřrslur/Interim Report [PDF 7.3 MB]
From June 29-July 24, 2009, the farm and surrounding valley at Vatnsfj÷r­ur, in the eastern part of ═safjar­ardj˙p, saw its seventh field season of archaeological excavation and landscape survey. Since 2003 an international, multidisciplinary team of archaeologists, historians, and natural scientists has been investigating the social, economic and environmental changes that occured at the farm of Vatnsfj÷r­ur between the tenth and twentieth centuries AD (Figures 1 and 2, above). The aim of the project is to explore the dynamism and interactiveness of the cultural landscape and the environment of the Westfjords over the past 1000 years in order to better understand where continued environmental and social changes might take the Westfjords in the future. By integrating textual, archaeological, and environmental evidence, the project aims to explain why the apparently infertile farm of Vatnsfj÷r­ur was chosen to be a chieftain’s seat, what factors and social processes enabled Vatnsfj÷r­ur to flourish as a social, economic and cultural powerhouse between the thirteenth and seventeenth centuries, and why the importance of the farm declined after the seventeenth century. [More details about this project.]

Vatnsfj÷r­ur 2009: Interim Report [PDF 7.3 MB]
From June 29-July 24, 2009, the farm and surrounding valley at Vatnsfj÷r­ur, in the eastern part of ═safjar­ardj˙p, saw its seventh field season of archaeological excavation and landscape survey. [More details about this project.]

Vatnsfj÷r­ur 2010: Framvinduskřrslur/Interim Report [PDF 22.7 MB]
This interim report provides details of the findings from the 2010 field season at Vatnsfj÷r­ur. The report provides background information of the site, include summary details of the work since 2003. An Icelandic introduction is also included. [More details about this project.]

Vatnsfj÷r­ur 2011: Framvinduskřrslur/Interim Report [PDF 9.5 MB]
The sixth field season on the Vatnsfj÷r­ur farm mound lasted from the 25th of July to the 20th of August 2011. The excavation was supervised by Oddgeir Isaksen, Gu­r˙n Alda GÝsladˇttir and Gar­ar Gu­mundsson, assisted by Ëskar GÝsli Sveinbjarnason, Dawn Elise Mooney and CÚline Dupont-HÚbert. The excavation was staffed by nine students of the 2011 Field School in North Atlantic Archaeology: Gilles Marciniak, Katarina Kolar, Lindsey Stirling, Matthew Cox, Nathan Rokke, Nika Shilobod, Sally Evans, Teva Vidal and Verena H÷fig. Post-excavation work was carried out by Oddgeir Isaksen, Gu­r˙n Alda GÝsladˇttir and Gar­ar Gu­mundsson. The project was managed for Fornleifastofnun ═slands by Gar­ar Gu­mundsson [More details about this project.]

Vatnsfj÷r­ur vi­ ═safjar­ardj˙p - Rannsˇknir sumari­ 2003 [PDF 0.7 MB]
[same stuff as in FS211] In 2003 four trenches were dug in the homefield of Vatnsfj÷r­ur to look at the future prospect for excavation. One was located in the farm mound which proved to be well preserved. The other three trenches revealed well preserved structures, possibly from the 10th century which give an exceptional opportunity to dive into that data without having to dig through many phases of occupation. [More details about this project.]

VegabŠtur ß Vegi Frß Reykjum Ý Ëlafsfir­i Upp ß Lßghei­i - Fornleifarannsˇknir ß Reykjum Ý Ëlafsfir­i og ß Lßghei­i [PDF 2.8 MB]
Archeological investigation was conducted in Reykir in Ëlafsfj÷r­ur in advance of construction plans. Three ruins were fully excavated, a trench excavated through a boundary wall and one cairn investigated. The boundary, which encloses a large area, most likely predates tephra layers from both 1766 and 1300 although it could not be verified completely. Ruin 1 is built up against the boundary and clearly postdates it. It is divided in two. It predates tephra from the 18th century but is clearly younger than the 1300 tephra. The function is not clear but most liklely relates to agricultural activities. Another small ruin was fully excavated and contained very thin cultural layers. Turf in the walls contained tephra from 1300 so the ruin clearly postdates that. The third ruin excavated was located in a wet area, also dated by 1300 tephra in the wall turf and interpreted as a possible enclosure of some sort. [More details about this project.]

V÷ktun framkvŠmda ß fyrirhuga­ri ßlverslˇ­ ß Bakka [PDF 5.2 MB]
In relation to construction work in the farm Bakki, subject to plans for building an aluminium factory, some machine digging took place and was supervised by an archaeologist. Two sections which showed some cultural activity or disturbance were recorded and planned. Trench 1 revealed the possible remains of an irrigation trench, not dated due to lack of tephra. The second section shows a similar feature, a cut of some sort which later has filled up with midden layers. Some pottery fragments dated to the 19th century were retrieved from the fill. [More details about this project.]

Ískuhaugsrannsˇknir ß Sk˙tust÷­um Ý Mřvatnssveit 2008 - Framvinduskřrsla I [PDF 5.5 MB]
A part of a midden in Sk˙tusta­ir was excavated. Two trenches were opened up and in addition an open profile which had been cleaned previously was moved back and an area behind it excavated. The midden proved to be extensive, up to 1,5 m deep and contains cultural layers from modern times back to the settlement period. It is well stratified, thanks to several tephra layers . Bones are well preserved and have already provided an interesting insight into the development of the Sk˙tusta­ir farm throughout the centuries. Excavations will continue over the next summers. [More details about this project.]

Ůinghald A­ Fornu - Fornleifarannsˇknir 2003 [PDF 2.4 MB]
This year´s (2003) excavation was dedicated to the ruin area around Biskupshˇlar (Bishops hills) east of river Íxarß as earlier trenching had given good results. An area of about 130 m2 was opened in the northeastern part of the hills. The remains excavated consisted of numerous steone alignments and part s of stone faced turf walls, fragments of an as yet unknown number of temporary structures, each of which may have undergone numerous episodes of repair and reconstruction. Positive dating evidence was somewhat limited, but deposits excavated in this area are believed to date to the post-medieval period. A limited programme of soil core testing took place to determine if midden deposits with preserved organic remains were present in buried soils. No obvious evidence of dense midden accumulations were found although several zones with less dramatic scales of cultural debris were defined. [More details about this project.]

Ůinghald til forna: Framvinduskřrsla 2002 [PDF 1.4 MB]
In 2002 new surface models were made of the following sites, using DGPS survey: Ůorskafjar­ar■ing, ┴rnes■ing, Ůingeyri in Dřrafj÷r­ur and Valseyri in Dřrafj÷r­ur. A large excavation project was started in Ůingvellir and a new set of research questions introduced. The aim was f.ex. to see how extensive the assembly site is, to try and date some of the structures and to see if it is possible to identify which structures belong to the assembly itself and which don´t. Preliminary excavation was conducted in three places: a) the so called "Njßlsb˙­". It was damaged due to waterflow and by a walking path. The structure could not be dated, no finds were retrieved and only few fragments of animal bones. A resistivity measurement showed a possible structure some 25 m west of Njßlsb˙­. This shows that the assembly most likely stretches further to the south and booths may have disappeared into the wet soil. b) Test-pits were excavated where a bishops staff had been found in 1957 but proved difficult due to trees and roots. A structure with turf- and stone walls was found and seems to be shaped as a booth. c) Biskupshˇlar were trenched in five places, hitherto considered one large booth. Landnßm tephra (871 +/-2) was found in building turf. It seems that Biskupshˇlar had a group of booths rather than one large booth. The place was considered very promising for further research. [More details about this project.]

Ůingvellir og ■inghald a­ fornu - Framvinduskřrsla 2005 [PDF 1.2 MB]
In 2005 excavation was continued in Ůingvellir. 1) A part of Mi­mundat˙n was surveyed with a ground penetrating radar to detect archaeological targets and two areas trenched, building on the survey results. A structure and a thick, charcoalrich layer was discovered in one trench but it remains unknown whether it belongs to the Thingvellir farm or the thingsite. 2) A part of Sigur­ur Vigf˙ssons trench from 1880 in the alleged L÷gberg was reopened and remains reassessed. A part of a possible stonebuilt structure was found but the trench was too small to give definite results. It was proposed that the other part of the trench would be reopened in 2005. 3) A part of an old trench in Sp÷ngin, east of Íxarß, was reopened, where a circular structure with an oblong ruin within can be seen on the surface. A part of a wall was found and the structures clearly postdate the landnßm tephra. Other dating evidence was not found. 4) An old trench in a small mound close to the alleged grave mound Ůorleifshˇlmi was reopened where some bone remains and a silver coin had been found back in 1920. Remains of a structure were found, possibly a booth, postdating the Landnßm tephra. Furthermore a rare find, a fragment of hacksilver. Spring assembly sites were visitied: Ůingeyrar, KrakalŠkjar■ing, Lambanes■ing. Finally, four trenches in Ůingey, S-Ůingeyjarsřsla, were excavated. A structure, possibly a booth, predating tephras from 1300 and 1477, was detected. Boundaries surrounding the site were excavated in three places but no tephras were found to seal them so accurate dating cannot be established at this point although they most likely date to the Middle Ages. [More details about this project.]

١rutˇftir ß Laugafells÷rŠfum : Fornleifarannsˇkn 2005 [PDF 1.5 MB]
An erosion face was cleaned and recorded in ١rutˇftir, northeast of Hofsj÷kull glacier. The site has been the subject of all sorts of oral histories f.ex. about the temporary settlement of people from Eyjafj÷r­ur at the time of Black Death in the 15th century. Previosly charcoal and ash had been noted in the erosion. However no substantial cultural layers were seen in the section. ١rutˇftir is now thought to be a temporary camping site at most, judging by a cut seen under the 1477 AD tephra. [More details about this project.]